What is a Masonic Grand Lodge?

What is a Masonic Grand Lodge?

A Masonic Grand Lodge is the supreme governing body that supervises and charters the particular Blue Lodges within its jurisdiction. The Grand Lodge will set a particular geographical area called it’s jurisdiction. A jurisdiction is sometimes state boundary, national boundary, or an agreed-upon geographical area in reference to a neighboring Grand Lodge. Each Grand Lodge is made up of Brother Masons who are in good standing with a particular subordinate Lodge in the Grand Lodge.

When several Grand Lodges claim the same jurisdictional area and/or claiming overlapping areas, each Grand Lodge will debate the oldest with legitimate documents from various other Grand Lodges. When claims are debated, normally the Grand Lodge would consider the other Grand Lodge as Clandestine or Irregular, therefore no Mason will allow or authorize to sit with the other Grand Lodge’s particular blue lodge meeting. Further, a particular Blue Lodge Mason will not be allowed to hold any type of official Masonic Communication with the other Grand Lodge’s particular blue lodge or any of its brothers.

How do would you start a Grand Lodge?

First, a convention must be held of the lodges in the area. At the convention, it needs to be determined by the Craft in the area that a Grand Master ought to be chosen to preside over the Craft in the area.  Generally, this area can be a State or Country, it is really based on the Craft in to decide in that area.

Next, during the convention, a committee will need to be appointed. Its purpose is to prepare a statement giving the reasons for such an action. This committee returns at some future period to make a report to Craft.

This report of the committee will cite the fact that the chartered Blue Lodges had been established under distinct, regular, and in some cases separate authorities. The report would identify the benefit or lack of a benefit and possibly or impossibly of having a Grand Master appointed by a foreign authority. If creating a Grand Lodge in this area is a matter of necessity the committee will report the reasons to the Craft.  It has been recorded that the Mother Grand Lodges have claimed the right to elect their officers distinct and separate from any foreign power.  The committee would then commend that the Craft of the area would and should be privileged to claim the same right, which is a right that Freemasons in all-time had enjoyed.

Can a Masonic Grand Lodge be chartered by another Grand Lodge?

No, individual lodges are chartered to a Grand Lodge. When necessary, these lodges can form a new Grand Lodge based on numerous issues based on distance and various other factors. The Mother Grand Lodge(s) of the Particular Blue Lodges generally will give its blessing of the new Grand Lodge, which will last forever.

Who is in charge of a Grand Lodge?

The official leader of the Grand Lodge is the Grand Master. The Grand Lodge Officers assist the Grand Master in his duties to effectively run the Grand Lodge.  Generally, in most Grand Lodges, the elected officers are as follows: GRAND MASTER; DEPUTY GRAND MASTER; DISTRICT GRAND MASTER; SENIOR GRAND WARDEN; JUNIOR GRAND WARDEN; GRAND TREASURER; and GRAND SECRETARY. Please note, each Grand Lodge may have its own set of elected officers and how their titles are spelled may differ from one Grand Lodge to another.

Furthermore, in many Grand Lodges, there are a number of appointed officers, but be aware in some Grand Lodges more than one person might be appointed in a given role, which are as follows: GRAND MARSHAL;  GRAND CHAPLAIN; GRAND LECTURER; SENIOR GRAND DEACON; JUNIOR GRAND DEACON; SENIOR GRAND STEWARD; JUNIOR GRAND STEWARD; GRAND SWORD BEARER; GRAND STANDARD BEARER; GRAND PURSUIVANT; GRAND ORGANIST; GRAND MUSICIAN;  GRAND TYLER; & GRAND HISTORIAN.

Some Grand Lodges have a Board of Directors to help the Grand Master run the Grand Lodge. While others tend to utilize the Past Grand Masters will various important projects within the Grand Lodge.  Modern-day Grand Lodges also employ a group support staff members as well. A Grand Lodge may employ a few professionals or numerous professionals based on the needs of the organization. Let’s look at some of the typical business office staff positions: Business Manager; Grand Secretary (which is sometimes a paid position); Grand Treasurer (which is also sometimes a paid position);
Comptroller; Executive Director; Staff Accountant; Accounts Payable/Insurance; Office Support Staff; Communications & Development Director;
Associate Director; Grand Lodge Library Director;  Webmaster; IT Coordinator; Supply Department Director; and a Building Manager.

Lastly, in the State of Pennsylvania, the Grand Master is called Right Worshipful whereas most other Grand Lodges call their Grand Master ‘Most Worshipful’. This is interesting because, in so many Grand Lodges, the title Right Worshipful is designated to the Grand Master’s District Deputy Grand Masters. His Grand Lodge Appointees help manage the various districts around the Grand Lodge.  The District Deputy Grand Master is also appointed to be his voice and they are the official Grand Lodge Representative for a Masonic District and generally speak on behalf of the Grand Master.

What is a Grand Orient?

A Grand Orient is another name for Grand Lodge. It is popular in some European countries such as France and Italy.  The Grand Orient of France is the oldest and the most important masonic obedience governing bodies in continental Europe. Born in 1728 as the First Grand Lodge of France, it took its current form and name in 1773.  At this time, I can not find any clear reason for the use of the term orient vs. lodge. The first known usage of the word ‘orient’ dates back to between 1755 and 1766. When the Vénérables of the lodges of the capital, gathered in a “Grand Lodge of the Masters of the Orient of Paris known as France”, to try to establish their authority on the whole of French Masonry.

Did you want more Freemasonry 101 topics to read? Good news, I am creating plenty for you to enjoy! I have been spending hours creating this information, so take a moment to read each one!  Or maybe you want to find a lodge in your neck of the woods? Good news – I am creating a complete review of each Grand Lodge – it will take time but I wanted you to have this information at your fingertips!  If you want to network with other Freemasons – check out our Facebook Group / Page now!

How can I find North Carolina Freemason lodges? – Find a Masonic Lodge Near You

Freemasonry Report
Freemasonry Report – Get Answers Here

How can I find North Carolina Freemason lodges? – Find a Masonic Lodge Near You

How can I find North Carolina Freemason lodges?  – Find a Lodge Near You today! Did you know that you and your family are welcomed to visit any Lodge within the State of North Carolina? It’s true – many Lodges host Family Nights, Open Lodge Meetings, Presentation and Award Events, and Social Gatherings in what Masons in North Carolina call their ‘Grand Lodge‘. Simply use the link below to contact a Lodge nearest you. Sometimes, towns are so close that one lodge actually covers both. While for rural communities – there maybe a county wide lodge in some cases.

Here’s how to find North Carolina Freemason Lodges Near You!

Grand Lodge of North Carolina logoWhen you call the lodge nearest you – just ask to attend the next open event, or schedule a visit with the Worshipful Master and Secretary.

The Worshipful Master and Officers of the Lodge will be happy to give you a tour of their Lodge. While touring the lodge building ask questions and learn more about how Freemasons helped improve your local community. The Lodge Officers are capable of explaining What is Freemasonry and how becoming a member can be a benefit to you and your family.  Many times, the Lodge Officers will go into detail about the history of Freemasonry and their particular Lodge.  Lastly, remember to invite your family members to ask questions and get the answers they are looking for.  North Carolina Freemasons pride themselves on being open and honest to directly address any of your questions or concerns. Here is the link to the lodge locator for the Grand Lodge Of Georgia.

Please note that the Freemasonry Report is run by Masons but it is not connected to, doing business with, or representing any Grand Lodge.

Enjoy learning about the History of the Grand Lodge Of North Carolina and how it was established…

Learn about the history of Freemasonry in North Carolina

Freemasonry was reputedly established in North Carolina at Masonborough in the mid-1730s. However, the first documented evidence of Masonic activity in the state can be dated to Wilmington and New Bern during the early 1750s.

Joseph Montfort was Treasurer of the Province of North Carolina, Colonel of Colonial troops, a patriot, and ardent Freemason. Montfort was born in England in 1724. He was a member of Royal White Hart Lodge at Halifax.

In 1771 the Duke of Beaufort commissioned Joseph Montfort Provincial Grand Master of North Carolina, a post he ably held until his death in 1776. Montfort’s exuberance for the fraternity led to his commission as Provincial Grand Master on January 14, 1771.

Montfort’s commission, which hangs in the Grand Lodge Office in Raleigh, was granted by Henry Somersest, the fifth Duke of Beaufort and Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of England.

Montfort’s short tenure as Provincial Grand Master proved to be a watershed for the development of Freemasonry in North Carolina. Montfort tirelessly promoted and organized the fraternity into an efficient and productive organization. He chartered at least ten lodges and helped reorganize a half dozen more.

Montfort’s affect on North Carolina Freemasonry cannot be understated, and for that reason his name bears the highest award offered by the Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of North Carolina. Montfort died in North Carolina, March 25, 1776.  But his zeal for the fraternity helped lay the foundation for the creation of the Grand Lodge in 1787.

Between Montfort’s death and the end of the American Revolution, the Provincial Grand Lodge Lodge of North Carolina essentially ceased to exist, though individual lodges continued to operate. In 1787 several delegates from several lodges across the state met at Tarborough to establish a new Grand Lodge and elected Samuel Johnston as their new Grand Master.

The Proceedings of the Grand Lodge in North Carolina have been published annually since 1787. These Proceedings are the historical minutes chronicling the business of the Grand Lodge. These records contain, among other things, Masonic law, committee reports, financial reports, officer listings, membership lists, lodge listings, correspondence, speeches, and much more. They are laden with important historical context concerning the fraternity, as well as the history of North Carolina and many influential citizens of the State.  I recommend visiting this link to read this information further.

Why do the North Carolina Freemasons use A.F. & A.M. in their Grand Lodge and Blue Lodge Titles?

From 1751 to 1813, there were actually two different and separate Grand Lodges in England. This caused to titles to be used to know what Brother Freemasons were part of which Grand Lodge at that time.  In the city of London, both Grand Lodges had their headquarters and both disagreed on certain matters which were critical to them at that time. The brothers actually were all part of the same Grand Lodge prior to the year 1751.

The division was caused by two groups in the Grand Lodge.  The first group was called the “Moderns”. It was made of lodges that were actually the older of the factions. The second group was called the “Antients”, which later became the “Ancients”.

The “Moderns” used the title – F.& A.M. and the “Antients” used the title A.F. &A.M.

This disagreement continued until 1813 when the two groups began formal Masonic Communication between the English Grand Lodges. Thankfully, the disagreement was later fully healed around 1880, but by that time, there were Blue Lodges and Grand Lodges all over the United States that were descended from either the “Moderns” or “Antients” Grand Lodge. So each group kept their corresponding initials with which they were formed. Therefore, this is why the Grand Lodge of North Carolina also kept the title of A.F. &A.M.

Today, all regular Grand Lodges acknowledge the history and have regular communications between the Grand Lodges within the United States.  Yet, there are small differences within different states’ ritual wording and Grand Lodge By-Laws and procedures. Many brothers love to visit and watch/listen to a degree when visiting the state of North Carolina.  Any visiting Brother of a Regular Blue Lodge from a different Regular Grand Lodge are regarded equally as Brothers and Masons.

North Carolina Freemasonry is Charity in action!

Freemasons have been a force for charity and goodwill in North Carolina longer than any other organization, supporting the oldest children’s home and oldest elder-care facility in the state for more than a century.

Since 1929, the brethern established and support the efforts of their own foundation. It is called the “North Carolina Masonic Foundation” and it has played a critical role in that work, ensuring the financial support and vitality of the Masonic Home for Children at Oxford and WhiteStone: A Masonic and Eastern Star Community in Greensboro.

The brethren who created the foundation ensured many things for Masonic Families in North Carolina. Just months after creating the foundation, the stock market crashed and the beginning of the Great Depression ensued across the state as well as the nation. The visionary thinking of these Masons ensured the safety of both homes through good times and bad, and formalized the Craft’s pledge to support and fund both homes for generations to come.

Such foresight guaranteed that masonic charitable work would endure, even after they were gone – today, the Grand Lodge of North Carolina is one of only four states that still have both a Masonic children’s home and an elder-care facility.

Today, the Noth Carolina Masonic Foundation:

  1. Assists the Charles Edward Cathey Scholarship Fund and other endowed scholarships;
  2. Oversees the Masonic Historic Preservation Fund;
  3. Offers the opportunity for lodges and subordinate bodies to invest with the NCMF to achieve long-term gains on lodge reserve resources;
  4.  Advocates for fundraising efforts from lodge events to capital campaigns on behalf of our two major charities;
  5.  Educates the Craft on development, fund-raising and charitable issues;
  6.  With the Grand Lodge of North Carolina A.F. & A.M., supports production of The North Carolina Mason newspaper;
  7.  And supports the greater mission of fraternity to foster faith, hope, and charity across North Carolina.

Who are the top leaders in the Masonic Grand Lodge of North Carolina?

Currently, the top elected/appointed leadership of the Grand Lodge of North Carolina are as follows: Grand Master; Deputy Grand Master; Senior Grand Warden; Junior Grand Warden; Grand Treasurer; Grand Secretary; Senior Grand Deacon; Junior Grand Deacon; Grand Marshal; Senior Grand Steward; Junior Grand Steward; Grand Tyler; Grand Chaplain; Grand Historian; Grand Lecturer; and the  Judge Advocate. The Most Worshipful Grand Master is the top leader for Freemasonry in the State of North Carolina.

Please note that the Freemasonry Report is run by Masons but it is not connected to, doing business with, or representing any Grand Lodge. Read more interesting articles now about Freemasonry.

How can I find Texas Freemason lodges? – Find a Masonic Lodge Near You

How can I find Texas Freemason Lodges? - Find a Lodge Near You Now
Freemasonry Report
Freemasonry Report – Get Answers Here

How can I find Texas Freemason lodges? – Find a Masonic Lodge Near You

Texas Freemason Lodges… How can I find Texas Freemason lodges?  – Find a Lodge Near You today! Did you know that you and your family are welcomed to visit any Lodge within the State of Texas? It’s true – many Lodges host Family Nights, Open Lodge Meetings, Presentation and Award Events, and Social Gatherings in what Masons in Texas call their ‘Grand Lodge‘. Simply use the link below to contact a Lodge nearest you. Sometimes, towns are so close that one lodge actually covers both. While for rural communities – there maybe a county wide lodge in some cases.

Here’s how to find Texas Freemason Lodges Near You!

When you call the lodge nearest you – just ask to attend the next open event, or schedule a visit with the Worshipful Master and Secretary.

The Worshipful Master and Officers of the Lodge will be happy to give you a tour of their Lodge. While touring the lodge building ask questions and learn more about how Freemasons helped improve your local community. The Lodge Officers are capable of explaining What is Freemasonry and how becoming a member can be a benefit to you and your family.  Many times, the Lodge Officers will go into detail about the history of Freemasonry and their particular Lodge.  Lastly, remember to invite your family members to ask questions and get the answers they are looking for.  Texas Freemasons pride themselves on being open and honest to directly address any of your questions or concerns. Here is the link to the lodge locator for the Grand Lodge Of Texas.

Please note that the Freemasonry Report is run by Masons but it is not connected to, doing business with, or representing any Grand Lodge.

Enjoy learning about the History of the Grand Lodge Of Texas and how it was established…

Texas Freemason Lodges – Learn about the history of Freemasonry in Texas

How can I find Texas Freemason Lodges? - Find a Lodge Near You Now
How can I find Texas Freemason Lodges? – Find a Lodge Near You Now

In the 1800’s Texas, one thing many of the settlers had in common when arriving to Texas was Freemasonry. Various good men of different backgrounds, professions, and cultures could often found offering a hearty welcome in the “friendly grip” of the brother Master Mason’s handshake. The first Mason known to have entered Texas was Major Zebulon M. Pike. He was a member of Lodge No. 3, Philadelphia. Brother Pike came in to Texas around 1806 and 1807, scouting the headwaters of the Arkansas and Red rivers, and the Spanish settlements of the Rio Grande.

As the winds of Texas’ war of independence began to blow in the fall of 1835, there were many Masons in the foremost positions of authority, both military and political. The Texans’ first shot was fired by Eli Mitchell on October 2, 1835, near Gonzales. He and his commander, Colonel John H. Moore, were both Masons.

In March 1835 the first Masonic meeting was held in Texas for the purpose of establishing a lodge in Texas. Six Masons met under an oak tree near the town of Brazoria. They applied to the Grand Lodge of Louisiana for a dispensation to form and open a Lodge. A dispensation was issued and later a charter. This first Texas lodge was called Holland Lodge No. 36. It was named after then Grand Master of Masons in Louisiana, John Henry Holland. Anson Jones was the first Worshipful Master of Holland Lodge No. 36, now Holland Lodge No. 1. The charter was brought by John M. Allen and given to Anson Jones just prior to the battle of San Jacinto.

Masonic historian Dr. James D. Carter counts twenty-two known Masons among the fifty-nine signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence, signed at Washington-on-the Brazos on March 2, 1836.  On March 6, 1836, after thirteen days of siege, the fortified Mission San Antonio de Valero, known as the Alamo, fell to the final onslaught of Mexican troops under the dictator General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna. Among the 188 Texans who died that day, only a handful can be reliably identified as members of the fraternity.

Two more Texas lodges were formed, also given dispensation and charter by the Grand Lodge of Louisiana. They were: Milam Lodge No. 40 in Nacogdoches, and McFarland Lodge No. 41 in San Augustine. Both were formed in 1837. These two lodges, together with Holland Lodge No. 36, sent representatives to meet in Houston and established the Grand Lodge of the Republic of Texas. The convention elected Anson Jones the first Grand Master of Masons in Texas. It should be noted that Anson Jones was the fourth and final President of the Republic of Texas, prior to becoming a state.

Grand Lodge of Texas Logo

THE GRAND LODGE OF THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS

By the end of 1837, three lodges had been chartered in Texas by the Grand Lodge of Louisiana: Holland Lodge No. 36, Milam Lodge No. 40 at Nacogdoches, and McFarland Lodge No. 41 at San Augustine. On December 20, 1837, President Sam Houston presided over a convention of representatives of these three lodges in the city of Houston, and elected Anson Jones the first Grand Master of Masons in Texas. The first meeting of the Grand Lodge of the Republic of Texas was held in Houston on April 16, 1838.

By the year 1846, did you know that Freemasons had served in nearly every major governmental post in the Republic? It’s true!

All the Presidents and Vice Presidents of the Republic of Texas were Masons. In 1844, George K. Teulon, Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of the Republic of Texas, addressing a gathering of Masons in Portland, Maine, observed “Texas is emphatically a Masonic Country: Our national emblem, the ‘Lone Star’, was chosen from among the emblems selected by Freemasonry, to illustrate the moral virtues — it is a five-pointed star, and alludes to the five points of fellowship.”

The First Particular Lodges in the Republic of Texas

Here is a list of the very first blue lodges in the Republic of Texas: Holland No. 1 Houston; Milam No. 2 Nacogdoches; McFarland No. 3 San Augustine; Temple No. 4 Houston; St. John’s No. 5 Brazoria; Harmony No. 6 Galveston; Matagorda No. 7 Matagorda; Phoenix No. 8 Washington; DeKalb No. 9 DeKalb; Perfect Union No. 10 (this lodge was never officially chartered) San Antonio; Milam No. 11 Independence; Austin No. 12 Austin; Constantine No. 13 Bonham; Trinity No. 14 Livingston; Santa Fe No. 15 (this is another lodge that was never officially chartered) Santa Fe (N.M.); Friendship No. 16 Clarksville; Orphan’s Friend No. 17 Anderson; Washington No. 18 Washington; Forrest No. 19 Huntsville; Graham No. 20 Brenham; Trinity No. 21. Crockett; Marshall No. 22 Marshall; Clinton No. 23 Henderson; Red Land No. 24 San Augustine; and Montgomery No. 25 Montgomery. Please note, that some of the information can be sourced from the book, The Texas Masons, by Pete Normand. Copyright 1986, Brazos Valley Masonic Library.

What does Freemasonry feel like in Texas?

Texas Freemasonry feels like is a fraternity. The Texas Freemason Lodges’s membership is restricted to men. Yet there is no hazing as is found in some college fraternities. The Masonic Order is a serious group, most especially in the State of Texas.

It exists to take good men and help them to become better men. Thus, it is not a reform society. It does not exist to reform criminals, nor would such persons benefit from its teachings.

Masonry has a proud heritage of over 170 years of service to the State of Texas. They hope to continue serving the state for another 170 years and beyond. This blog article was designed to help you to better become understanding of the purpose of our fraternal organization.

Texas Freemasons now look to the future with the hope that a better understanding will allow particular blue lodges to seen as the rightful place to find men of integrity and honesty in every Texas community. This needs to be right alongside of the church, the home, the schools, and the civic organizations as a positive force for good. With this better understanding,

Freemasons in Texas have every reason to believe that they can all work together to make their government, their schools and their churches even stronger than before. The strength of Texas has always been built upon the combined efforts of all these groups, and the Grand Lodge of Texas has contributed valuable service to Texas churches, our nation, the state of Texas and of course the local communities in Texas. So if you are ready to find a lodge near you – now is your chance…check out this link to the Texas Lodge Locator Program

 

Freemasonry Report - Square and Compass
Freemasonry Report – Square and Compass

Who are the top leaders in the Masonic Grand Lodge of Texas?

Currently, the top elected/appointed leadership of the Grand Lodge of Texas are as follows: Most Worshipful Grand Master; Deputy Grand Master; Senior Grand Warden; Junior Grand Warden; Grand Treasurer; Grand Secretary; Grand Chaplain; Grand Marshal; Grand Orator; Senior Grand Deacon; Junior Grand Deacon; First Grand Steward; Second Grand Steward; Third Grand Steward; and Grand Tyler.

The Most Worshipful Grand Master is the top leader for Freemasonry in the State of Texas.

Please note that the Freemasonry Report is run by Masons but it is not connected to, doing business with, or representing any Grand Lodge. Read more interesting articles now about Freemasonry.

 

How can I find Alabama Freemason lodges? – Find a Masonic Lodge Near You

How can I find Alabama Freemason Lodges? - Find a Lodge Near You Now
Freemasonry Report
Freemasonry Report – Get Answers Here

How can I find Alabama Freemason lodges? – Find a Masonic Lodge Near You

How can I find Alabama Freemason lodges?  – Find a Lodge Near You today! Did you know that you and your family are welcomed to visit any Lodge within the State of Alabama? It’s true – many Lodges host Family Nights, Open Lodge Meetings, Presentation and Award Events, and Social Gatherings in what Masons in Alabama call their ‘Grand Lodge‘. Simply use the link below to contact a Lodge nearest you. Sometimes, towns are so close that one lodge actually covers both. While for rural communities – there maybe a county wide lodge in some cases.

How can I find Alabama Freemason Lodges? - Find a Lodge Near You Now
How can I find Alabama Freemason Lodges? – Find a Masonic Blue Lodge Near You Now

Here’s how to find Alabama Freemason Lodges Near You!

When you call the lodge nearest you – just ask to attend the next open event, or schedule a visit with the Worshipful Master and Secretary.

The Worshipful Master and Officers of the Lodge will be happy to give you a tour of their Lodge. While touring the lodge building ask questions and learn more about how Freemasons helped improve your local community. The Lodge Officers are capable of explaining What is Freemasonry and how becoming a member can be a benefit to you and your family.  Many times, the Lodge Officers will go into detail about the history of Freemasonry and their particular Lodge.  Lastly, remember to invite your family members to ask questions and get the answers they are looking for.  Alabama Freemasons pride themselves on being open and honest to directly address any of your questions or concerns. Here is the link to the lodge locator for the Grand Lodge Of Alabama.

Please note that the Freemasonry Report is run by Masons but it is not connected to, doing business with, or representing any Grand Lodge.

Grand Lodge of Alabama
The Grand Lodge of Alabama F. & A. M.

Enjoy learning about the Mission, Objectives, Goals, and the Rich History of the Grand Lodge Of Alabama on how it was established…

The mission of the Grand Lodge of Alabama is to provide a strong and viable leadership to the Masons of Alabama. To develop and implement programs to assist the lodges in becoming more visible and active in the communities and to promote Friendship, Morality and Brotherly Love throughout the state. To facilitate the charitable outreach of the Grand Lodge of Alabama. To promote Honor, Integrity and Truth to all men.

The objectives of the Grand Lodge of Alabama are as follows:

  • Reverse the declining membership in the lodges.
  • To maintain a positive financial condition of the Grand Lodge.
  • Continue and develop the Communication/Leadership Workshops that will aid and assist the Masters, Wardens, and Secretaries of the subordinate lodges into the next millennium.
  • To support the charitable outreach programs of the Grand Lodge.
  • Continue to review the Alabama Masonic Code (law) to meet modern day needs, goals and objectives of the Masonic fraternity in Alabama.
  • Promote and support our Masonic youth programs in Alabama.
  • Show leadership and support to all appendant bodies of Masonry in Alabama.
  • Project the Mission of this Grand Lodge to each individual member.

Goals to meet the Objectives

  • Educate the lodges through the Committee on Work, District Lecturers and the Education and Public Relations Committee on such programs as the “Friend to Friend” program, service to the community and family involvement.
  • Manage and develop the real and personal property assets of the Grand Lodge to provide present and future budget funding. Prevent future requirements/requests for increased Grand Lodge dues. To coordinate and report such actions at each Grand Lodge Communication until this goal is realized.
    Continue and develop Communication/Leadership workshops throughout the state in different areas of the state.
  • To work closely with and support the Charitable Outreach Committee in determining and providing for our Masonic family which will enhance adequate funding for present and future charitable needs.
  • Maintain a committee for the review of the Constitution and Edicts. This committee will make the necessary recommendations to the annual Grand Lodge session for approval of the proposed changes.
  • Promote the visibility and needs of our Youth programs to all appendant bodies. Support our Grand Lodge Youth Committee and communicate required programs and needs to all charitable Masonic Bodies of our Grand Jurisdiction.
  • Promote and maintain harmonious relationships with all appendant bodies through communication and identification of common goals to support Masonry. To assist and request assistance to meet mutual goals. Grand Lodge Officers will meet at least once during the Masonic year with all appendant body leaders.
    Insure that every lodge receives the “Mission Statement” and Objectives of the Grand Lodge and understands and supports the Goals set to meet the objectives.

Learn about the rich history of Freemasonry in Alabama

Did you know that Helion Lodge No. 1, was “The Birthplace of Freemasonry in Alabama”? In 2012, it celebrated the 200 anniversary (or Bicentennial) of Freemasonry in Alabama.

The original charter was granted to Madison Lodge No. 21 of Huntsville by the Grand Lodge of Kentucky on August 28, 1812. “This Lodge … still exists as Helion No. 1,” according to Masonry in Alabama by masonic scholars.

On Aug. 20, 2011, Helion, began its celebration of 200 years of Freemasonry in Alabama by recognizing the Bicentennial of the Dispensation of Madison Lodge No. 21 of Huntsville, Mississippi Territory, granted by the Grand Lodge of Kentucky on Aug. 28, 1811. Later, this Lodge would become Madison Lodge No. 1 of the
Grand Lodge of Alabama, later united with Alabama/Bethesda Lodge No. 2 of Huntsville, as Helion Lodge No. 1.

It is said that inside the lodge is the flag of Alabama, flanked by the flags of Kentucky and Tennessee, representing Helion’s origins in these states. Also, it is important to note, if you ever wish to visit this blue lodge that the original 1811 Bible is still upon the altar. It is important recognize that original brethren of Madison Lodge No. 21, who began the practice of Masonry on Sept. 6, 1811. Among these brothers were the leading political, agricultural, and commercial, leaders of not only Huntsville, but of Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee.

In 1811, the steamboat named “New Orleans”, which was the first steamboat to land at a Louisville wharf, thus beginning the birth of that city as a great center of commerce and culture. In August of this same year the Kentucky brothers established Freemasonry in Huntsville, Mississippi Territory, by granting a dispensation
to the brothers of Madison Lodge No. 21, Grand Lodge of Kentucky, receiving its charter in Aug., 1812.

These brothers would be among the leaders of this city as a center of commerce and culture. The brothers of Madison, Alabama/Bethesda, and Helion lodges are found among the prominent leaders of government, trade and commerce, medicine, education, and the arts throughout the history of Huntsville and Madison County, as well as Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee.

Trade and business brothers included operative masons, Thomas and William Brandon (natural and Masonic brothers of Madison Lodge), Historian
Judge T. J. Taylor refers to them as, “the builders of the city, had come here (from Franklin, Tenn.) in 1810 with no property except their trowels and great
skill in their trade, and from a straggling wooding village they made a city of stone and brick.”

Establishing the Grand Lodge of Alabama

In 1824, Helion (Helion: of Helios, Greek Titan God of Light) Lodge No. 1 was established by the Grand Lodge of Alabama by the union of Alabama Lodge No.1 (Est. 1821, formerly Madison No. 21 of Kentucky) and Bethesda Lodge No. 2. Bethesda was formerly Alabama Lodge No. 21 of the Grand Lodge of Tennessee in 1818, becoming Alabama No. 2 of Alabama, in 1821, and later Bethesda No. 2 of Alabama

Thus, as the great Tennessee River unites the Commonwealth of Kentucky with the states of Alabama and Tennessee, so also is Helion Lodge a symbol of Masonic brotherhood among these great states. Brother Founding Fathers of Huntsville, and the Establishment of the Lodge Hall Tradition holds that the founding fathers of Huntsville, John Hunt and Leroy Pope were brother Masons.

Colonel Pope’s grand mansion, “Poplar Grove”, one of the earliest brick structures in Alabama, was built in 1814. In 1823, he sold a lot fronting this grand estate (sale price of one dollar) that “the three Masonic Bodies now constituted and subsisting in Huntsville, Eunomia Chapter V, Madison Lodge I, and Bethesda Lodge II or such… regularly constituted Masonic Body or Bodies… to… cause to be erected and finished Building and Improvements….”

Thus began the first Lodge building, Eunomia Hall (Eunomia: Greek Goddess of law and legislation). On Nov. 22, 1823, the brothers of Madison, (Bethesda), and “a number of visiting brethren from neighbor lodges… forming procession in order to lay the Corner stone of Eunomia Hall…” The first floor served as the school of Mrs. Jane Childs (1848- 1853), a meeting place for the Baptist Society, and as the synagogue for the congregation B’nai Shalom from 1876 to 1898. Five congregation members were Helion Brothers. This building remained until 1920, and was attached to the north wall of the present 1917 temple.

During the War Between the States or the American Civil War, the blue lodge was divided with some brothers leaning towards the Union while other were for the Confederacy.  Therefore, history denotes that some of Brothers from the original blue lodge in Alabama served the forces of the Confederacy, while other Brothers
were prominent Unionist leaders. During the 1862, the city of Huntsville was occupied by Union forces at the beginning of April. This continued to be the case until the end of the civil war. Sadly, there was alot of death and destruction throughout the Tennessee Valley and unfortunately many of Tennessee Valley Lodges were destroyed. Thankfully, the Helion’s Eunomia Hall (it’s first lodge building) escaped destruction and preserved this landmark of the history of the Grand Lodge of Alabama.

Freemasonry Report - Square and Compass
Freemasonry Report – Square and Compass

Who are the top leaders in the Masonic Grand Lodge of Alabama?

Currently, the top elected/appointed leadership of the Grand Lodge of Alabama are as follows: Most Worshipful Grand Master; Right Worshipful Deputy Grand Master; Right Worshipful Senior Grand Warden; Right Worshipful Junior Grand Warden; Grand Treasurer; Grand Secretary; Grand Tiler; Grand Chaplain; Grand Marshal; Grand Orator; Grand Historian; Senior Grand Deacon; Junior Grand Deacon; Senior Grand Steward; Junior Grand Steward; and Deputy Grand Tiler. The Most Worshipful Grand Master is the top leader for Freemasonry in the State of Alabama.

Learn what cities and townships have blue lodges in Alabama so you can find Alabama Freemason Lodges!

The cities and townships with blue lodges of the Grand Lodge of Alabama are as follows: Huntsville in Madison County; Monroeville in Monroe County; Tuscaloosa in Tuscaloosa County; Moulton in Lawrence County;
Grove Hill in Clarke County; Mount Olive in Jefferson County; Butler in Choctaw County; Montgomery in Montgomery County; Florence in Lauderdale County; Athens in Limestone County;  Linden in Marengo County; Camden in Wilcox County; Decatur in Morgan County; Tuscumbia in Colbert County; Courtland in Lawrence County;  and Wetumpka in Elmore County.

Alabama Freemason Lodges are also available in these cities and towns in Alabama: Mobile in Mobile County; Livingston in Sumter County; Jacksonville in Calhoun County; Leighton in Colbert County; Eufaula in Barbour County; Demopolis in Marengo County; Evergreen in Conecuh County; Troy in Pike County; Union Springs in Bullock County; Greenville in Butler County; Millbrook in Elmore County; Mobile in Mobile County;
Montevallo in Shelby County; Dadeville in Tallapoosa County; LaFayette in Chambers County; Opelika in Lee County; St. Stephens in Washington County; Centreville in Bibb County; Prattville in Autauga County; Wedowee in Randolph County; and Piedmont in Calhoun County.

Please note that the Freemasonry Report is run by Masons but it is not connected to, doing business with, or representing any Grand Lodge. Read more interesting articles now about Freemasonry.

How can I find Georgia Freemason lodges? – Find a Masonic Lodge Near You

How can I find Georgia Freemason Lodges? - Find a Lodge Near You Now
Freemasonry Report
Freemasonry Report – Get Answers Here

How can I find Georgia Freemason lodges? – Find a Masonic Lodge Near You

How can I find Georgia Freemason lodges?  – Find a Lodge Near You today! Did you know that you and your family are welcomed to visit any Lodge within the State of Georgia? It’s true – many Lodges host Family Nights, Open Lodge Meetings, Presentation and Award Events, and Social Gatherings in what Masons in Georgia call their ‘Grand Lodge‘. Simply use the link below to contact a Lodge nearest you. Sometimes, towns are so close that one lodge actually covers both. While for rural communities – there maybe a county wide lodge in some cases.

Grand Lodge of Georgia - Freemason LogoHere’s how to find Georgia Freemason Lodges Near You!

When you call the lodge nearest you – just ask to attend the next open event, or schedule a visit with the Worshipful Master and Secretary.

The Worshipful Master and Officers of the Lodge will be happy to give you a tour of their Lodge. While touring the lodge building ask questions and learn more about how Freemasons helped improve your local community. The Lodge Officers are capable of explaining What is Freemasonry and how becoming a member can be a benefit to you and your family.  Many times, the Lodge Officers will go into detail about the history of Freemasonry and their particular Lodge.  Lastly, remember to invite your family members to ask questions and get the answers they are looking for.  Georgia Freemasons pride themselves on being open and honest to directly address any of your questions or concerns. Here is the link to the lodge locator for the Grand Lodge Of Georgia.

Please note that the Freemasonry Report is run by Masons but it is not connected to, doing business with, or representing any Grand Lodge.

Enjoy learning about the History of the Grand Lodge Of Georgia and how it was established…

Learn about the history of Freemasonry in Georgia

A band of English colonists under the leadership of General James Edward Oglethorpe. He was a British soldier, statesman and humanitarian. General James Edward Oglethorpe arrived on the west bank of the Savannah River on February 12, 1733. This was the birth of the English Province of Georgia, the last of the Thirteen Colonies. Georgia was the southwestern frontier of British America for many years.

In the same year, December 13, 1733, the Grand Lodge of England at its Quarterly Communication in London adopted a resolution to “collect the Charity of this Society towards enabling the Trustees (of Georgia) to send distressed Brethren to Georgia where they may be comfortably provided for…that it be strenuously (sic) recommended by the Masters and Wardens of regular Lodges to make a generous collection amongst all their Members for that purpose…”

Find Georgia Freemason LodgesThe First Particular Lodges in Georgia

Some three months later, February 21, 1734, a Lodge of Freemasons was organized at Savannah under the “old Customs” (without warrant). Noble Jones, intimate friend of James Oglethorpe, was initiated on that date, the first Freemason made in Georgia. On December 2, 1735, the Lodge was warranted by the Grand Lodge of England and entered on the engraved list as “The Lodge at Savannah in Ye Province of Georgia”. It was assigned number 139 on the register of English Lodges. By 1770 its number had been reduced to No. 63 and by 1792 it was No. 46, although no longer an English Lodge.

The Lodge at Savannah changed its name in or prior to 1770 to Solomon’s Lodge. In 1774 and 1775, respectively, the Grand Lodge of England warranted two more Lodges in Savannah, Unity No. 465 and Grenadiers No. 481. Both Lodges died an early death.

Except for that brief period, Solomon’s Lodge was the only Lodge in Georgia from 1734 until 1785. Solomon’s Lodge was the second duly constituted Lodge in America, next only to a Lodge in Boston warranted in 1733. Solomon’s Lodge is the Mother Lodge of Georgia.

The Early/Provincial Grand Masters in Georgia

Serving as Provincial Grand Masters in Georgia were: Grey Elliott, 1760 until he was succeeded in 1771 by Noble Jones. Brother Jones served until his death in 1775. Sometime during the War for independence, Samuel Elbert, American soldier and later Governor of Georgia, was “elected” Provincial Grand Master. On December 15, 1786, Brother Elbert resigned as Provincial Grand Master so that the independent Grand Lodge of Georgia might be formed.

A group of dissident Freemasons in Savannah, disapproving the workings of Solomon’s Lodge, petitioned the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania in 1784 for a charter to organize a Lodge. Their petition was granted by Pennsylvania on March 31, 1785, the Lodge being listed on Pennsylvania’s register as no. 42, to be known as Hiram Lodge, Savannah, Georgia.

Freemasonry Report - Square and Compass
Freemasonry Report – Square and Compass
The Beginning of the new F. & A. M. Grand Lodge in Georgia

In the true spirit of Freemasonry the differences between the two Lodges were soon reconciled. In the following year it is known that two additional Lodges existed in the state, one at Augusta and one at Washington. It is believed these four Lodges, on December 16, 1786, met together and created the most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons for the State of Georgia. William Stephens, Past Master of Solomon’s Lodge, now No. 1, and the first U.S. Court Judge in Georgia, was elected and installed Grand Master.

The next eight Lodges in Georgia were: Columbia No. 3, Augusta; St. Louis No. 4, Washington; Washington No. 5, Washington; St. John’s No. 6, Sunbury; Little River No. 7, Little River; St. Patrick’s No. 8, Waynesboro; St. George’s No. 9, Kiokas; Union No. 10, Savannah.

With the exception of Solomon’s No. 1, all of the above Lodges are extinct. Social Lodge, originally No. 18, Augusta, Georgia, now also No. 1, was chartered in December, 1799. Georgia has 402 Lodges and 32,773 members.

Freemasonry has existed continuously in Georgia since 1734. The Grand Lodge of Georgia, F. & A. M., has existed since 1786.

The Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons for the of Georgia was incorporated with perpetual duration on February 6, 1796, by an Act of the General Assembly of Georgia passed for that purpose, and has been delivered down to the present day.

Who are the top leaders in the Masonic Grand Lodge of Georgia?

Currently, the top elected/appointed leadership of the Grand Lodge of Georgia are as follows: Most Worshipful Grand Master; Deputy Grand Master; Senior Grand Warden; Junior Grand Warden; Grand Treasurer; Grand Secretary; Grand Chaplain; Grand Marshal; Grand Orator; Senior Grand Deacon; Junior Grand Deacon; First Grand Steward; Second Grand Steward; Third Grand Steward; and Grand Tyler. The Most Worshipful Grand Master is the top leader for Freemasonry in the State of Georgia.

Please note that the Freemasonry Report is run by Masons but it is not connected to, doing business with, or representing any Grand Lodge. Read more interesting articles now about Freemasonry.

How can I find California Freemason Lodges? – Find a Lodge Near You

How can I find California Freemason Lodges? - Find a Lodge Near You Now
Freemasonry Report
Freemasonry Report – Get Your Answers Here

How can I find California Freemason Lodges? – Find a Lodge Near You

How can I find California Freemason Lodges? – Find a Lodge Near You today! Did you know that you and your family are welcomed to visit any Lodge within the State of California? It’s true – many Lodges host Family Nights, Open Lodge Meetings, Presentation and Award Events, and Social Gatherings in what Masons in California call their ‘Grand Lodge‘. Simply use the link below to contact a Lodge nearest you. Sometimes, towns are so close that one lodge actually covers both. While for rural communities – there maybe a county wide lodge in some cases.

Freemasonry report for the Grand Lodge of California

The mission of the Masons of California is to foster personal growth and improve the lives of others. Further, their mission is guided by the enduring and relevant principles of our fraternity:

  1. Brotherly love. Freemasons of the Grand Lodge of California value respect, freedom, kindness, tolerance, and our differences – religious, ethnic, cultural, social, generational, and educational – and strive for harmony in our individual lives, in our lodges, and in the global community.
  2. Relief. California Freemason’s take responsibility for the well-being of our brothers, our families, and the community as a whole. We provide relief through philanthropy, community involvement, and delivery of excellent care.
  3. Truth. They also stay true to our personal code of conduct and ethics – honor, integrity, personal responsibility, and the continuous pursuit of knowledge.

Learn about the California Freemason Lodges – Here is how you can find a Lodge Near You!

When you call the lodge nearest you – just ask to attend the next open event, or schedule a visit with the Worshipful Master and Secretary.

The Worshipful Master and Officers of the Lodge will be happy to give you a tour of their Lodge. While touring the lodge building ask questions and learn more about how Freemasons helped improve your local community. The Lodge Officers are capable of explaining What is Freemasonry and how becoming a member can be a benefit to you and your family.  Many times, the Lodge Officers will go into detail about the history of Freemasonry and their particular Lodge.  Lastly, remember to invite your family members to ask questions and get the answers they are looking for.  California Freemasons pride themselves on being open and honest to directly address any of your questions or concerns. Here is the link to the lodge locator for the Grand Lodge Of California.

A Brief History of Freemasonry in California

Masonry has been an integral part of California for more than 150 years. During the Gold Rush of 1849, thousands of settlers came to California in search of fortune. Many of these men were Masons and brought with them Masonic values and traditions. Not surprisingly, some of California’s first Masonic lodges were established in the mining towns of the Gold Country. Therefore, in 1850 – the same year that California became a state – the Grand Lodge of California was established in Sacramento.

Did you know that within 10 years, the number of Masonic lodges in the new state had grown from 11 to 130, while membership soared from 258 to more than 5,000. Over the years, the Masons have played a key role in shaping the history of California. To date, 19 California governors have been Masons, and at least four California Masons have been elected to the U.S. Senate. With that being said, today there are more than 50,000 members and about 330 lodges, making the Grand Lodge of California one of the largest in the world.

Who is the top leader in a Grand Lodge of California? 

The top leader is the Grand Master. He leads and manages the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of California. For more information about the Grand Master – please visit the Grand Lodge of California’s website.

Please note that the Freemasonry Report is run by Masons but it is not connected to, doing business with, or representing any Grand Lodge.

How can I find Florida Freemason Lodges? – Find a Lodge Near You

How can I find Florida Freemason Lodges? - Find a Lodge Near You Now

How can I find Florida Freemason Lodges? – Find a Lodge Near You

How can I find Florida Freemason Lodges? – Find a Lodge Near You today! Did you know that you and your family are welcomed to visit any Lodge within the State of Florida? It’s true – many Lodges host Family Nights, Open Lodge Meetings, Presentation and Award Events, and Social Gatherings in what Masons in Florida call their ‘Grand Lodge‘. Simply use the link below to contact a Lodge nearest you. Sometimes, towns are so close that one lodge actually covers both. While for rural communities – there maybe a county wide lodge in some cases.

Grand Lodge of Florida - Masonic Logo for the Freemasonry ReportFinding Florida Freemason Lodges is answered here – Find a Lodge Near You!

When you call the lodge nearest you – just ask to attend the next open event, or schedule a visit with the Worshipful Master and Secretary.

The Worshipful Master and Officers of the Lodge will be happy to give you a tour of their Lodge. While touring the lodge building ask questions and learn more about how Freemasons helped improve your local community. The Lodge Officers are capable of explaining What is Freemasonry and how becoming a member can be a benefit to you and your family.  Many times, the Lodge Officers will go into detail about the history of Freemasonry and their particular Lodge.  Lastly, remember to invite your family members to ask questions and get the answers they are looking for.  Florida Freemasons pride themselves on being open and honest to directly address any of your questions or concerns. Here is the link to the lodge locator for the Grand Lodge Of Florida.

Who are the top masonic leaders in the Grand Lodge of Florida?

In the State of Florida, the Grand Lodge Elected Officers are as follows: Most Worshipful Grand Master; Deputy Grand Master; Senior Grand Warden; Junior Grand Warden; Grand Secretary; and the Grand Treasurer. The Most Worshipful Grand Master is the top leader of the Grand Lodge of Florida.

Grand Lodge Appointed Officers in the Grand Lodge are as follows: Grand Chaplain and is titled the – Right Reverend; W∴ Grand Orator; W∴ Grand Marshal;  W∴ Senior Grand Deacon; W∴ Junior Grand Deacon; W∴ Grand Standard Bearer; W∴ Grand Sword Bearer; W∴ Senior Grand Steward; W∴ Junior Grand Steward; W∴ Grand Pursuivant; W∴ Grand Tyler; W∴ Grand Historian; and W∴ Grand Musician.

Who are the top masonic leaders in a blue lodge in Florida?

In the State of Florida, the blue lodge elected officers are as follows: the Worshipful Master; Senior Warden; Junior Warden; Secretary; and the Treasurer. The Worshipful Master is the top leader of a blue lodge in Florida. The appointed officers in a blue lodge are as follows: Chaplain; Marshal;  Senior Deacon; Junior Deacon; Senior Steward; Junior Steward; Historian; Tyler; and the Musician.

What Florida cities or towns have a Masonic Lodge?

Here is the cities and townships with a Masonic Lodge in Florida: Cantonment;  Century; Pensacola; Jay; Pace; Milton; Gulf Breeze; Fort Walton Beach; Baker; Crestview; Defuniak Springs; Freeport; Laurel Hill; Niceville; Paxton; Bonifay; Cottondale; Blountstown; Westville; Marianna; Chipley; Ponce De Leon; Vernon; Wausau; Panama City; Apalachicola; Callaway; Lynn Haven Port Saint Joe; Saint Andrews; Wewahitchka; Crawfordville; Carrabelle; Chattahoochee;  Havana;  Monticello; Tallahassee; Live Oak; Branford; Lake City; Wellborn; Day; Greenville; Jasper; Old Town; Lake City; Madison; Mayo; Branford; Perry; Cross City; Wellborn; Fernandina Beach; Baldwin; and Callahan.

These are cities and townships with a Masonic Lodge in Florida as well: Macclenny; Jacksonville; Sanderson; Neptune Beach; Live Oak; Orange Park; Jacksonville Beach; Archer;  Starke; Chiefland; Gainesville; Hawthorne; High Springs; Newberry; Lake Butler; Micanopy; Brooker; Raiford; Waldo; Trenton; Saint Augustine; Bunnell; Green Cove Springs; Hastings; Lake Como; Keystone Heights; Middleburg; Palatka; Palatka; Ormond Beach; Belleview; Dunnellon; Inglis; Fort McCoy; Ocala; Silver Springs; Williston; Deltona; Daytona Beach; New Smyrna Beach; Palm Coast; DeLand; Sanford; Barberville; Brooksville; Bushnell; Inverness; Dade City; Homosassa;  New Port Richey; Floral City; Zephyrhills; Clermont; Groveland; Leesburg; Tavares; Mount Dora; The Villages; Umatilla; and Wildwood.

A few more cities and townships with a Masonic Lodge in Florida to review: Orlando; Casselberry; Saint Cloud; Apopka; Kissimee; Oviedo; Saint Cloud; Winter Garden; Winter Park; Indialantic; Cocoa; Cocoa Beach; Mims; Melbourne; Titusville; Merritt Island; Palm Bay; Clearwater; Dunedin; Madeira Beach; Trinity; Largo; St. Petersburg; Safety Harbor; Tarpon Springs; Tampa; Lutz; Brandon; Riverview; Land O Lakes; Plant City; Temple Terrace; Dover; Bowling Green; Mulberry; Fort Meade; Frostproof; Haines City; Kathleen; Lake Wales; Lakeland; Lake Placid; Avon Park; Sebring; Lake Alfred; Bartow; Wauchula; Winter Haven; Stuart; Fort Pierce Moore Haven; Okeechobee; Sebastian; Clewiston; Vero Beach; Englewood; Bradenton; Arcadia; Sarasota; Punta Gorda; Venice; and West Bradenton.

The final group of cities and towns with a Masonic Lodge in the State of Florida to read over: Cape Coral; Naples; Fort Myers Beach; LaBelle; Lehigh Acres; North Fort Myers; Everglades City; Fort Myers; East Naples; Boca Raton; Boynton Beach; Greenacres; Palm Beach Gardens; Lake Worth; West Palm Beach; Jupiter;  Dania Beach; Fort Lauderdale; Dania; Oakland Park; Deerfield Beach; Dania Beach; West Hollywood; Pembroke Pines; South Miami; Coral Gables; Hialeah; Miami; Miami Springs; Homestead; Miami Shores; Tavernier; Key West; and Marathon.

Please be aware that some Masonic Lodges represent an area for more rural or urban places around the State of Florida. So therefore, it is not uncommon to see a Masonic in the neighboring township representing both towns, a Masonic Lodge representing the county if it is very rural, or a Masonic Lodge representing only the area Southern, Eastern, Central, Western or Northern part of a city in some cases. Here is the link to the lodge locator for the Grand Lodge of Florida

Please note that the Freemasonry Report is run by Masons but it is not connected to, doing business with, or representing any Grand Lodge.

Thanks for visiting the Freemasonry Report and we hope are enjoying reading all about Freemasonry!