How can I find Texas Freemason lodges? – Find a Masonic Lodge Near You

How can I find Texas Freemason Lodges? - Find a Lodge Near You Now
Freemasonry Report
Freemasonry Report – Get Answers Here

How can I find Texas Freemason lodges? – Find a Masonic Lodge Near You

Texas Freemason Lodges… How can I find Texas Freemason lodges?  – Find a Lodge Near You today! Did you know that you and your family are welcomed to visit any Lodge within the State of Texas? It’s true – many Lodges host Family Nights, Open Lodge Meetings, Presentation and Award Events, and Social Gatherings in what Masons in Texas call their ‘Grand Lodge‘. Simply use the link below to contact a Lodge nearest you. Sometimes, towns are so close that one lodge actually covers both. While for rural communities – there maybe a county wide lodge in some cases.

Here’s how to find Texas Freemason Lodges Near You!

When you call the lodge nearest you – just ask to attend the next open event, or schedule a visit with the Worshipful Master and Secretary.

The Worshipful Master and Officers of the Lodge will be happy to give you a tour of their Lodge. While touring the lodge building ask questions and learn more about how Freemasons helped improve your local community. The Lodge Officers are capable of explaining What is Freemasonry and how becoming a member can be a benefit to you and your family.  Many times, the Lodge Officers will go into detail about the history of Freemasonry and their particular Lodge.  Lastly, remember to invite your family members to ask questions and get the answers they are looking for.  Texas Freemasons pride themselves on being open and honest to directly address any of your questions or concerns. Here is the link to the lodge locator for the Grand Lodge Of Texas.

Please note that the Freemasonry Report is run by Masons but it is not connected to, doing business with, or representing any Grand Lodge.

Enjoy learning about the History of the Grand Lodge Of Texas and how it was established…

Texas Freemason Lodges – Learn about the history of Freemasonry in Texas

How can I find Texas Freemason Lodges? - Find a Lodge Near You Now
How can I find Texas Freemason Lodges? – Find a Lodge Near You Now

In the 1800’s Texas, one thing many of the settlers had in common when arriving to Texas was Freemasonry. Various good men of different backgrounds, professions, and cultures could often found offering a hearty welcome in the “friendly grip” of the brother Master Mason’s handshake. The first Mason known to have entered Texas was Major Zebulon M. Pike. He was a member of Lodge No. 3, Philadelphia. Brother Pike came in to Texas around 1806 and 1807, scouting the headwaters of the Arkansas and Red rivers, and the Spanish settlements of the Rio Grande.

As the winds of Texas’ war of independence began to blow in the fall of 1835, there were many Masons in the foremost positions of authority, both military and political. The Texans’ first shot was fired by Eli Mitchell on October 2, 1835, near Gonzales. He and his commander, Colonel John H. Moore, were both Masons.

In March 1835 the first Masonic meeting was held in Texas for the purpose of establishing a lodge in Texas. Six Masons met under an oak tree near the town of Brazoria. They applied to the Grand Lodge of Louisiana for a dispensation to form and open a Lodge. A dispensation was issued and later a charter. This first Texas lodge was called Holland Lodge No. 36. It was named after then Grand Master of Masons in Louisiana, John Henry Holland. Anson Jones was the first Worshipful Master of Holland Lodge No. 36, now Holland Lodge No. 1. The charter was brought by John M. Allen and given to Anson Jones just prior to the battle of San Jacinto.

Masonic historian Dr. James D. Carter counts twenty-two known Masons among the fifty-nine signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence, signed at Washington-on-the Brazos on March 2, 1836.  On March 6, 1836, after thirteen days of siege, the fortified Mission San Antonio de Valero, known as the Alamo, fell to the final onslaught of Mexican troops under the dictator General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna. Among the 188 Texans who died that day, only a handful can be reliably identified as members of the fraternity.

Two more Texas lodges were formed, also given dispensation and charter by the Grand Lodge of Louisiana. They were: Milam Lodge No. 40 in Nacogdoches, and McFarland Lodge No. 41 in San Augustine. Both were formed in 1837. These two lodges, together with Holland Lodge No. 36, sent representatives to meet in Houston and established the Grand Lodge of the Republic of Texas. The convention elected Anson Jones the first Grand Master of Masons in Texas. It should be noted that Anson Jones was the fourth and final President of the Republic of Texas, prior to becoming a state.

Grand Lodge of Texas Logo

THE GRAND LODGE OF THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS

By the end of 1837, three lodges had been chartered in Texas by the Grand Lodge of Louisiana: Holland Lodge No. 36, Milam Lodge No. 40 at Nacogdoches, and McFarland Lodge No. 41 at San Augustine. On December 20, 1837, President Sam Houston presided over a convention of representatives of these three lodges in the city of Houston, and elected Anson Jones the first Grand Master of Masons in Texas. The first meeting of the Grand Lodge of the Republic of Texas was held in Houston on April 16, 1838.

By the year 1846, did you know that Freemasons had served in nearly every major governmental post in the Republic? It’s true!

All the Presidents and Vice Presidents of the Republic of Texas were Masons. In 1844, George K. Teulon, Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of the Republic of Texas, addressing a gathering of Masons in Portland, Maine, observed “Texas is emphatically a Masonic Country: Our national emblem, the ‘Lone Star’, was chosen from among the emblems selected by Freemasonry, to illustrate the moral virtues — it is a five-pointed star, and alludes to the five points of fellowship.”

The First Particular Lodges in the Republic of Texas

Here is a list of the very first blue lodges in the Republic of Texas: Holland No. 1 Houston; Milam No. 2 Nacogdoches; McFarland No. 3 San Augustine; Temple No. 4 Houston; St. John’s No. 5 Brazoria; Harmony No. 6 Galveston; Matagorda No. 7 Matagorda; Phoenix No. 8 Washington; DeKalb No. 9 DeKalb; Perfect Union No. 10 (this lodge was never officially chartered) San Antonio; Milam No. 11 Independence; Austin No. 12 Austin; Constantine No. 13 Bonham; Trinity No. 14 Livingston; Santa Fe No. 15 (this is another lodge that was never officially chartered) Santa Fe (N.M.); Friendship No. 16 Clarksville; Orphan’s Friend No. 17 Anderson; Washington No. 18 Washington; Forrest No. 19 Huntsville; Graham No. 20 Brenham; Trinity No. 21. Crockett; Marshall No. 22 Marshall; Clinton No. 23 Henderson; Red Land No. 24 San Augustine; and Montgomery No. 25 Montgomery. Please note, that some of the information can be sourced from the book, The Texas Masons, by Pete Normand. Copyright 1986, Brazos Valley Masonic Library.

What does Freemasonry feel like in Texas?

Texas Freemasonry feels like is a fraternity. The Texas Freemason Lodges’s membership is restricted to men. Yet there is no hazing as is found in some college fraternities. The Masonic Order is a serious group, most especially in the State of Texas.

It exists to take good men and help them to become better men. Thus, it is not a reform society. It does not exist to reform criminals, nor would such persons benefit from its teachings.

Masonry has a proud heritage of over 170 years of service to the State of Texas. They hope to continue serving the state for another 170 years and beyond. This blog article was designed to help you to better become understanding of the purpose of our fraternal organization.

Texas Freemasons now look to the future with the hope that a better understanding will allow particular blue lodges to seen as the rightful place to find men of integrity and honesty in every Texas community. This needs to be right alongside of the church, the home, the schools, and the civic organizations as a positive force for good. With this better understanding,

Freemasons in Texas have every reason to believe that they can all work together to make their government, their schools and their churches even stronger than before. The strength of Texas has always been built upon the combined efforts of all these groups, and the Grand Lodge of Texas has contributed valuable service to Texas churches, our nation, the state of Texas and of course the local communities in Texas. So if you are ready to find a lodge near you – now is your chance…check out this link to the Texas Lodge Locator Program

 

Freemasonry Report - Square and Compass
Freemasonry Report – Square and Compass

Who are the top leaders in the Masonic Grand Lodge of Texas?

Currently, the top elected/appointed leadership of the Grand Lodge of Texas are as follows: Most Worshipful Grand Master; Deputy Grand Master; Senior Grand Warden; Junior Grand Warden; Grand Treasurer; Grand Secretary; Grand Chaplain; Grand Marshal; Grand Orator; Senior Grand Deacon; Junior Grand Deacon; First Grand Steward; Second Grand Steward; Third Grand Steward; and Grand Tyler.

The Most Worshipful Grand Master is the top leader for Freemasonry in the State of Texas.

Please note that the Freemasonry Report is run by Masons but it is not connected to, doing business with, or representing any Grand Lodge. Read more interesting articles now about Freemasonry.

 

How can I find Alabama Freemason lodges? – Find a Masonic Lodge Near You

How can I find Alabama Freemason Lodges? - Find a Lodge Near You Now
Freemasonry Report
Freemasonry Report – Get Answers Here

How can I find Alabama Freemason lodges? – Find a Masonic Lodge Near You

How can I find Alabama Freemason lodges?  – Find a Lodge Near You today! Did you know that you and your family are welcomed to visit any Lodge within the State of Alabama? It’s true – many Lodges host Family Nights, Open Lodge Meetings, Presentation and Award Events, and Social Gatherings in what Masons in Alabama call their ‘Grand Lodge‘. Simply use the link below to contact a Lodge nearest you. Sometimes, towns are so close that one lodge actually covers both. While for rural communities – there maybe a county wide lodge in some cases.

How can I find Alabama Freemason Lodges? - Find a Lodge Near You Now
How can I find Alabama Freemason Lodges? – Find a Masonic Blue Lodge Near You Now

Here’s how to find Alabama Freemason Lodges Near You!

When you call the lodge nearest you – just ask to attend the next open event, or schedule a visit with the Worshipful Master and Secretary.

The Worshipful Master and Officers of the Lodge will be happy to give you a tour of their Lodge. While touring the lodge building ask questions and learn more about how Freemasons helped improve your local community. The Lodge Officers are capable of explaining What is Freemasonry and how becoming a member can be a benefit to you and your family.  Many times, the Lodge Officers will go into detail about the history of Freemasonry and their particular Lodge.  Lastly, remember to invite your family members to ask questions and get the answers they are looking for.  Alabama Freemasons pride themselves on being open and honest to directly address any of your questions or concerns. Here is the link to the lodge locator for the Grand Lodge Of Alabama.

Please note that the Freemasonry Report is run by Masons but it is not connected to, doing business with, or representing any Grand Lodge.

Grand Lodge of Alabama
The Grand Lodge of Alabama F. & A. M.

Enjoy learning about the Mission, Objectives, Goals, and the Rich History of the Grand Lodge Of Alabama on how it was established…

The mission of the Grand Lodge of Alabama is to provide a strong and viable leadership to the Masons of Alabama. To develop and implement programs to assist the lodges in becoming more visible and active in the communities and to promote Friendship, Morality and Brotherly Love throughout the state. To facilitate the charitable outreach of the Grand Lodge of Alabama. To promote Honor, Integrity and Truth to all men.

The objectives of the Grand Lodge of Alabama are as follows:

  • Reverse the declining membership in the lodges.
  • To maintain a positive financial condition of the Grand Lodge.
  • Continue and develop the Communication/Leadership Workshops that will aid and assist the Masters, Wardens, and Secretaries of the subordinate lodges into the next millennium.
  • To support the charitable outreach programs of the Grand Lodge.
  • Continue to review the Alabama Masonic Code (law) to meet modern day needs, goals and objectives of the Masonic fraternity in Alabama.
  • Promote and support our Masonic youth programs in Alabama.
  • Show leadership and support to all appendant bodies of Masonry in Alabama.
  • Project the Mission of this Grand Lodge to each individual member.

Goals to meet the Objectives

  • Educate the lodges through the Committee on Work, District Lecturers and the Education and Public Relations Committee on such programs as the “Friend to Friend” program, service to the community and family involvement.
  • Manage and develop the real and personal property assets of the Grand Lodge to provide present and future budget funding. Prevent future requirements/requests for increased Grand Lodge dues. To coordinate and report such actions at each Grand Lodge Communication until this goal is realized.
    Continue and develop Communication/Leadership workshops throughout the state in different areas of the state.
  • To work closely with and support the Charitable Outreach Committee in determining and providing for our Masonic family which will enhance adequate funding for present and future charitable needs.
  • Maintain a committee for the review of the Constitution and Edicts. This committee will make the necessary recommendations to the annual Grand Lodge session for approval of the proposed changes.
  • Promote the visibility and needs of our Youth programs to all appendant bodies. Support our Grand Lodge Youth Committee and communicate required programs and needs to all charitable Masonic Bodies of our Grand Jurisdiction.
  • Promote and maintain harmonious relationships with all appendant bodies through communication and identification of common goals to support Masonry. To assist and request assistance to meet mutual goals. Grand Lodge Officers will meet at least once during the Masonic year with all appendant body leaders.
    Insure that every lodge receives the “Mission Statement” and Objectives of the Grand Lodge and understands and supports the Goals set to meet the objectives.

Learn about the rich history of Freemasonry in Alabama

Did you know that Helion Lodge No. 1, was “The Birthplace of Freemasonry in Alabama”? In 2012, it celebrated the 200 anniversary (or Bicentennial) of Freemasonry in Alabama.

The original charter was granted to Madison Lodge No. 21 of Huntsville by the Grand Lodge of Kentucky on August 28, 1812. “This Lodge … still exists as Helion No. 1,” according to Masonry in Alabama by masonic scholars.

On Aug. 20, 2011, Helion, began its celebration of 200 years of Freemasonry in Alabama by recognizing the Bicentennial of the Dispensation of Madison Lodge No. 21 of Huntsville, Mississippi Territory, granted by the Grand Lodge of Kentucky on Aug. 28, 1811. Later, this Lodge would become Madison Lodge No. 1 of the
Grand Lodge of Alabama, later united with Alabama/Bethesda Lodge No. 2 of Huntsville, as Helion Lodge No. 1.

It is said that inside the lodge is the flag of Alabama, flanked by the flags of Kentucky and Tennessee, representing Helion’s origins in these states. Also, it is important to note, if you ever wish to visit this blue lodge that the original 1811 Bible is still upon the altar. It is important recognize that original brethren of Madison Lodge No. 21, who began the practice of Masonry on Sept. 6, 1811. Among these brothers were the leading political, agricultural, and commercial, leaders of not only Huntsville, but of Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee.

In 1811, the steamboat named “New Orleans”, which was the first steamboat to land at a Louisville wharf, thus beginning the birth of that city as a great center of commerce and culture. In August of this same year the Kentucky brothers established Freemasonry in Huntsville, Mississippi Territory, by granting a dispensation
to the brothers of Madison Lodge No. 21, Grand Lodge of Kentucky, receiving its charter in Aug., 1812.

These brothers would be among the leaders of this city as a center of commerce and culture. The brothers of Madison, Alabama/Bethesda, and Helion lodges are found among the prominent leaders of government, trade and commerce, medicine, education, and the arts throughout the history of Huntsville and Madison County, as well as Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee.

Trade and business brothers included operative masons, Thomas and William Brandon (natural and Masonic brothers of Madison Lodge), Historian
Judge T. J. Taylor refers to them as, “the builders of the city, had come here (from Franklin, Tenn.) in 1810 with no property except their trowels and great
skill in their trade, and from a straggling wooding village they made a city of stone and brick.”

Establishing the Grand Lodge of Alabama

In 1824, Helion (Helion: of Helios, Greek Titan God of Light) Lodge No. 1 was established by the Grand Lodge of Alabama by the union of Alabama Lodge No.1 (Est. 1821, formerly Madison No. 21 of Kentucky) and Bethesda Lodge No. 2. Bethesda was formerly Alabama Lodge No. 21 of the Grand Lodge of Tennessee in 1818, becoming Alabama No. 2 of Alabama, in 1821, and later Bethesda No. 2 of Alabama

Thus, as the great Tennessee River unites the Commonwealth of Kentucky with the states of Alabama and Tennessee, so also is Helion Lodge a symbol of Masonic brotherhood among these great states. Brother Founding Fathers of Huntsville, and the Establishment of the Lodge Hall Tradition holds that the founding fathers of Huntsville, John Hunt and Leroy Pope were brother Masons.

Colonel Pope’s grand mansion, “Poplar Grove”, one of the earliest brick structures in Alabama, was built in 1814. In 1823, he sold a lot fronting this grand estate (sale price of one dollar) that “the three Masonic Bodies now constituted and subsisting in Huntsville, Eunomia Chapter V, Madison Lodge I, and Bethesda Lodge II or such… regularly constituted Masonic Body or Bodies… to… cause to be erected and finished Building and Improvements….”

Thus began the first Lodge building, Eunomia Hall (Eunomia: Greek Goddess of law and legislation). On Nov. 22, 1823, the brothers of Madison, (Bethesda), and “a number of visiting brethren from neighbor lodges… forming procession in order to lay the Corner stone of Eunomia Hall…” The first floor served as the school of Mrs. Jane Childs (1848- 1853), a meeting place for the Baptist Society, and as the synagogue for the congregation B’nai Shalom from 1876 to 1898. Five congregation members were Helion Brothers. This building remained until 1920, and was attached to the north wall of the present 1917 temple.

During the War Between the States or the American Civil War, the blue lodge was divided with some brothers leaning towards the Union while other were for the Confederacy.  Therefore, history denotes that some of Brothers from the original blue lodge in Alabama served the forces of the Confederacy, while other Brothers
were prominent Unionist leaders. During the 1862, the city of Huntsville was occupied by Union forces at the beginning of April. This continued to be the case until the end of the civil war. Sadly, there was alot of death and destruction throughout the Tennessee Valley and unfortunately many of Tennessee Valley Lodges were destroyed. Thankfully, the Helion’s Eunomia Hall (it’s first lodge building) escaped destruction and preserved this landmark of the history of the Grand Lodge of Alabama.

Freemasonry Report - Square and Compass
Freemasonry Report – Square and Compass

Who are the top leaders in the Masonic Grand Lodge of Alabama?

Currently, the top elected/appointed leadership of the Grand Lodge of Alabama are as follows: Most Worshipful Grand Master; Right Worshipful Deputy Grand Master; Right Worshipful Senior Grand Warden; Right Worshipful Junior Grand Warden; Grand Treasurer; Grand Secretary; Grand Tiler; Grand Chaplain; Grand Marshal; Grand Orator; Grand Historian; Senior Grand Deacon; Junior Grand Deacon; Senior Grand Steward; Junior Grand Steward; and Deputy Grand Tiler. The Most Worshipful Grand Master is the top leader for Freemasonry in the State of Alabama.

Learn what cities and townships have blue lodges in Alabama so you can find Alabama Freemason Lodges!

The cities and townships with blue lodges of the Grand Lodge of Alabama are as follows: Huntsville in Madison County; Monroeville in Monroe County; Tuscaloosa in Tuscaloosa County; Moulton in Lawrence County;
Grove Hill in Clarke County; Mount Olive in Jefferson County; Butler in Choctaw County; Montgomery in Montgomery County; Florence in Lauderdale County; Athens in Limestone County;  Linden in Marengo County; Camden in Wilcox County; Decatur in Morgan County; Tuscumbia in Colbert County; Courtland in Lawrence County;  and Wetumpka in Elmore County.

Alabama Freemason Lodges are also available in these cities and towns in Alabama: Mobile in Mobile County; Livingston in Sumter County; Jacksonville in Calhoun County; Leighton in Colbert County; Eufaula in Barbour County; Demopolis in Marengo County; Evergreen in Conecuh County; Troy in Pike County; Union Springs in Bullock County; Greenville in Butler County; Millbrook in Elmore County; Mobile in Mobile County;
Montevallo in Shelby County; Dadeville in Tallapoosa County; LaFayette in Chambers County; Opelika in Lee County; St. Stephens in Washington County; Centreville in Bibb County; Prattville in Autauga County; Wedowee in Randolph County; and Piedmont in Calhoun County.

Please note that the Freemasonry Report is run by Masons but it is not connected to, doing business with, or representing any Grand Lodge. Read more interesting articles now about Freemasonry.

How can I find Georgia Freemason lodges? – Find a Masonic Lodge Near You

How can I find Georgia Freemason Lodges? - Find a Lodge Near You Now
Freemasonry Report
Freemasonry Report – Get Answers Here

How can I find Georgia Freemason lodges? – Find a Masonic Lodge Near You

How can I find Georgia Freemason lodges?  – Find a Lodge Near You today! Did you know that you and your family are welcomed to visit any Lodge within the State of Georgia? It’s true – many Lodges host Family Nights, Open Lodge Meetings, Presentation and Award Events, and Social Gatherings in what Masons in Georgia call their ‘Grand Lodge‘. Simply use the link below to contact a Lodge nearest you. Sometimes, towns are so close that one lodge actually covers both. While for rural communities – there maybe a county wide lodge in some cases.

Grand Lodge of Georgia - Freemason LogoHere’s how to find Georgia Freemason Lodges Near You!

When you call the lodge nearest you – just ask to attend the next open event, or schedule a visit with the Worshipful Master and Secretary.

The Worshipful Master and Officers of the Lodge will be happy to give you a tour of their Lodge. While touring the lodge building ask questions and learn more about how Freemasons helped improve your local community. The Lodge Officers are capable of explaining What is Freemasonry and how becoming a member can be a benefit to you and your family.  Many times, the Lodge Officers will go into detail about the history of Freemasonry and their particular Lodge.  Lastly, remember to invite your family members to ask questions and get the answers they are looking for.  Georgia Freemasons pride themselves on being open and honest to directly address any of your questions or concerns. Here is the link to the lodge locator for the Grand Lodge Of Georgia.

Please note that the Freemasonry Report is run by Masons but it is not connected to, doing business with, or representing any Grand Lodge.

Enjoy learning about the History of the Grand Lodge Of Georgia and how it was established…

Learn about the history of Freemasonry in Georgia

A band of English colonists under the leadership of General James Edward Oglethorpe. He was a British soldier, statesman and humanitarian. General James Edward Oglethorpe arrived on the west bank of the Savannah River on February 12, 1733. This was the birth of the English Province of Georgia, the last of the Thirteen Colonies. Georgia was the southwestern frontier of British America for many years.

In the same year, December 13, 1733, the Grand Lodge of England at its Quarterly Communication in London adopted a resolution to “collect the Charity of this Society towards enabling the Trustees (of Georgia) to send distressed Brethren to Georgia where they may be comfortably provided for…that it be strenuously (sic) recommended by the Masters and Wardens of regular Lodges to make a generous collection amongst all their Members for that purpose…”

Find Georgia Freemason LodgesThe First Particular Lodges in Georgia

Some three months later, February 21, 1734, a Lodge of Freemasons was organized at Savannah under the “old Customs” (without warrant). Noble Jones, intimate friend of James Oglethorpe, was initiated on that date, the first Freemason made in Georgia. On December 2, 1735, the Lodge was warranted by the Grand Lodge of England and entered on the engraved list as “The Lodge at Savannah in Ye Province of Georgia”. It was assigned number 139 on the register of English Lodges. By 1770 its number had been reduced to No. 63 and by 1792 it was No. 46, although no longer an English Lodge.

The Lodge at Savannah changed its name in or prior to 1770 to Solomon’s Lodge. In 1774 and 1775, respectively, the Grand Lodge of England warranted two more Lodges in Savannah, Unity No. 465 and Grenadiers No. 481. Both Lodges died an early death.

Except for that brief period, Solomon’s Lodge was the only Lodge in Georgia from 1734 until 1785. Solomon’s Lodge was the second duly constituted Lodge in America, next only to a Lodge in Boston warranted in 1733. Solomon’s Lodge is the Mother Lodge of Georgia.

The Early/Provincial Grand Masters in Georgia

Serving as Provincial Grand Masters in Georgia were: Grey Elliott, 1760 until he was succeeded in 1771 by Noble Jones. Brother Jones served until his death in 1775. Sometime during the War for independence, Samuel Elbert, American soldier and later Governor of Georgia, was “elected” Provincial Grand Master. On December 15, 1786, Brother Elbert resigned as Provincial Grand Master so that the independent Grand Lodge of Georgia might be formed.

A group of dissident Freemasons in Savannah, disapproving the workings of Solomon’s Lodge, petitioned the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania in 1784 for a charter to organize a Lodge. Their petition was granted by Pennsylvania on March 31, 1785, the Lodge being listed on Pennsylvania’s register as no. 42, to be known as Hiram Lodge, Savannah, Georgia.

Freemasonry Report - Square and Compass
Freemasonry Report – Square and Compass
The Beginning of the new F. & A. M. Grand Lodge in Georgia

In the true spirit of Freemasonry the differences between the two Lodges were soon reconciled. In the following year it is known that two additional Lodges existed in the state, one at Augusta and one at Washington. It is believed these four Lodges, on December 16, 1786, met together and created the most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons for the State of Georgia. William Stephens, Past Master of Solomon’s Lodge, now No. 1, and the first U.S. Court Judge in Georgia, was elected and installed Grand Master.

The next eight Lodges in Georgia were: Columbia No. 3, Augusta; St. Louis No. 4, Washington; Washington No. 5, Washington; St. John’s No. 6, Sunbury; Little River No. 7, Little River; St. Patrick’s No. 8, Waynesboro; St. George’s No. 9, Kiokas; Union No. 10, Savannah.

With the exception of Solomon’s No. 1, all of the above Lodges are extinct. Social Lodge, originally No. 18, Augusta, Georgia, now also No. 1, was chartered in December, 1799. Georgia has 402 Lodges and 32,773 members.

Freemasonry has existed continuously in Georgia since 1734. The Grand Lodge of Georgia, F. & A. M., has existed since 1786.

The Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons for the of Georgia was incorporated with perpetual duration on February 6, 1796, by an Act of the General Assembly of Georgia passed for that purpose, and has been delivered down to the present day.

Who are the top leaders in the Masonic Grand Lodge of Georgia?

Currently, the top elected/appointed leadership of the Grand Lodge of Georgia are as follows: Most Worshipful Grand Master; Deputy Grand Master; Senior Grand Warden; Junior Grand Warden; Grand Treasurer; Grand Secretary; Grand Chaplain; Grand Marshal; Grand Orator; Senior Grand Deacon; Junior Grand Deacon; First Grand Steward; Second Grand Steward; Third Grand Steward; and Grand Tyler. The Most Worshipful Grand Master is the top leader for Freemasonry in the State of Georgia.

Please note that the Freemasonry Report is run by Masons but it is not connected to, doing business with, or representing any Grand Lodge. Read more interesting articles now about Freemasonry.

Does Freemasonry have it’s own Motorcycle Clubs?

Does Freemasonry Have Motorcycle Clubs?
Freemasonry Report
Freemasonry Report – Get the answers

Does Freemasonry have it’s own Motorcycle Clubs?

Does Freemasonry have it’s own Motorcycle Clubs? Yes, Freemason Motorcycle Clubs do exist. Not every Grand Lodge acknowledges every one of them.  The most popular Masonic MC’s are: The Widows Sons; The Low Twelve; The Temple Guard; The Seekers of the Light; The Ruffians; The Free Runners; Hiram’s Travelers; Stone Templars; & The Stolen Souls; plus numerous others not listed.   Also, the Shrine has a big Harley Motorcycle unit in each of their regional locations around the country.

Why does Freemasonry allow Motorcycle Clubs?

Simply, the Freemasons are a caring friendly group of men interested in doing fun things together. Riding a motorcycle is just another way for Masons to meet and have fellowship with each other. All Masonic MCs are not ‘one percenters’ and they generally don’t have 3 part/piece patches on their jackets. No Freemason club is an outlaw club. They are good men who enjoy riding with their brothers.

How the Masonic Membership setup for a Masonic Motorcycle Club?

Membership in a club is defined in numerous levels. These are similar to most mainstream biker / riding clubs. They are defined as – Full Patch Members, Associate

Freemasonry Report - Square and Compass
Freemasonry Report – Square and Compass

Members,Prospects, and Hang Arounds. Each club will define these in detail but this article is simply sharing the norm.  It is wise to ask for the membership levels / dues and sharing your Masonic Membership card prior to joining any club.  It is also important to understand what the bylaws and code of conduct for the members in the club would be as well. Most clubs require a minimum bike’s engine size to be a club member too.

The average code of conduct for a Freemason Biker Club is very straightforward. It will tell all it’s members that they are expected to conduct themselves in a manner so as to bring honor and respect to the club at all times. Further, any actions, by a member, deemed detrimental to the organization, shall be cause for review under the disciplinary procedures and could result in discipline up to or including suspension or expulsion from membership. Lastly, if the actions very un-Masonic in nature – a brother can be brought up on charges in his blue lodge or grand lodge.

Masonic motorcycle riding clubs are not like the Sons of Anarchy show from the television. At no time should any Master Mason become associated with 1% or “outlaw” organizations. Such association shall be deemed grounds for immediate suspension and possible revocation of membership. Further, it could be deemed as un-Masonic in some Grand Lodges. This could cause the Brother Mason to be removed from the fraternity if he is found guilty of these charges. Further, MC members may join or be associated with other charitable Riding Clubs. Such as the Patriot Guard, Bikers Against Child Abuse or Bikers Against Animal Cruelty. Each club has the right to grant approval of the Club’s Membership or by the club’s leadership. Other clubs may request the member surrender his patch and resign the club. So it is good to ask these questions prior to joining.

FULL PATCH MOTORCYCLE CLUB MASONIC BROTHERS:

There are requirements to be a Full Patch Member in the club.  Here is a list of some generally accepted requirements for a Brother Mason to be ready for prior to joining:

  1. He shall be a Master Mason in Good Standing with his Blue Lodge.
  2. The Brother Mason must possess a valid motorcycle operator license.
  3. He must possess current motorcycle registration and insurance.
  4. Proof of ownership of a 500cc or larger cruiser style motorcycle.
  5. Successfully completed or passed the minimum time as a prospect.
  6. The brother must be elected to membership by a unanimous vote of the members.
  7. The Master Mason status does not automatically make a member. Final determination of membership shall be based on meeting all the Full Patch requirements.
PROSPECT MOTORCYCLE CLUB MASONIC BROTHERS:

There are requirements to be a Prospect Member in the club.  Here is a list of some generally accepted requirements for a Brother Mason to be ready for prior to joining:

  1. He should be a Master Mason, Fellow Craft or Enter Apprentice in good standing with his Blue Lodge.
  2. The brother needs to be sponsored by a Full Patch Member of the club.
  3. Proof of owning and riding a 500cc or larger cruiser style motorcycle that is in good working order.
  4. Agreeing to requests during the prospect period
  5. Understanding that as a prospect, he still must be voted on for this status by a unanimous vote of the members.
  6. Successfully complete all hang-around requirements.
HANG-AROUNDS MOTORCYCLE CLUB MASONIC BROTHERS:
  1. Any man that is recommended by a Full Patch Member. Some clubs use this as recruiting tool for the Blue Lodge
  2. He should possess a valid motorcycle operator license.
  3. The man should possess current motorcycle registration and insurance.
  4. He needs to show an dedicated interest in joining the Club
  5. The man wants to obtain more information by riding with and attending Club functions. If he not a Freemason, he should inquire on how to join.
ASSOCIATE MEMBER MOTORCYCLE CLUB MASONIC BROTHERS:
  1. He shall be a Master Mason in Good Standing with his Blue Lodge.
  2. The Brother Mason must possess a valid motor vehicle operator license.
  3. He must possess current vehicle registration and insurance.
  4. The is brother should be willing to help and assist any member with cycle issues.
  5. Successfully completed or passed the minimum time as a prospect.
  6. The brother must be elected to membership by a unanimous vote of the members.
  7. The Master Mason status does not automatically make a member. Final determination of membership shall be based on a voting meeting of all the Full Patch / Associate Members.

Does Freemasonry have it’s own Motorcycle Clubs? – Leadership of the Masonic Biker Club

Freemason Motorcycle ClubsUnderstanding who are the Officers and What responsibilities is important to understand prior to joining too. The main club officers are elected by the club. Normally, these officer roles are as follows – President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Executive Board Members . Furthermore, the requirement of an elected position is normally one year in the office, on time with dues payments, and the brother should be a full patched member. But, some clubs are smaller or have dedicated Masons with longer terms of office. Lastly, any valid challenge for office is made by a full patched member or by a vote of no confidence is held based on gross negligence if necessary.

Additional officers appointed can be a Sergeant at Arms, a Road Captain, and a Tail Gunner. Some clubs have several brothers serving in these roles while other clubs mandate only one man can be appointed in a given 12 month period. These positions are generally appointed only by the President and/or the Vice President.

What does the Masonic Motorcycle Club President do?

Here is a brief overview of what some of his executive duties normally are:

  • To preside over meetings of both the Executive Board and the Club as a whole.
  • To judge items not covered in the rules and regulations.
  • To act as the personal representative of the Club in the area of public relations, as a liaison between the MC and Grand Lodges, blue lodges, local law enforcement agencies and as a connecting link between motorcycle Clubs.
  • To represent the Club in any Club business contacts and to supervise major economic transactions unless delegated to another member for business purposes only.
  • To assist officers in the interpretation of their Club responsibilities, and to promote Club life among member in general.
  • To be a member of the Combined Executive Committee.

What does the Masonic Biker Club Vice President do?

Here is a brief overview of what some of his executive duties normally are:

  • To assume the responsibilities of the presidency when the President is unable to do so.
  • To oversee Prospect progress and present a report during the regular meeting.
  • To be a member of the combined Executive Committee.
  • To manage committees and report on their progress

What does the Masonic Biker Club Secretary do?

Does Freemasonry Have Motorcycle Clubs?
Does Freemasonry Have Motorcycle Clubs?

The executive duties of the secretary are as follows:

  • To record and safeguard the minutes of the Club meetings.
  • To maintain the Club Bylaws, recording any additions, deletions or modifications.
  • To handle any Club correspondence.
  • To collect all money from the membership, create a receipt and pay the same to the Treasurer.
  • To Record beginning and ending balances monthly for reporting at church.
  • To act as a connecting link between motorcycle Clubs and solicitors.

What does the Masonic Biker Club Treasurer do?

The executive duties of the treasurer are as follows:

  • To receive all money from the Secretary and deposit upon receipt.
  • To monitor and record the Club’s income and expenditures.
  • To collect the dues and fines owing by members.
  • To Maintain full accounting details and present full reports with bank statements for audit.

What does the Masonic Biker Club Executive Board Member do?

The elected board members shall constitute the Executive Committee along with the all the elected officers and sometimes the Sergeant at Arms. All members of the Executive Committee shall constitute a quorum present. Electronic meetings shall be authorized. The executive committee is responsible for:

  • The monitoring of conflicts within the Club.
  • The application of disciplinary procedures.
  • The evaluation of prospects and their progress.
  • Presentation of the state of the Club to all members.
  • To make minor decisions on behalf of the Club when approval from the membership is not readily available (ex. Flowers for a funeral or other function).

What does the Masonic Biker Club Sergeant at Arms do?

The duties of the Sergeant at Arms are as follows:

  • To maintain order at Club meetings in particular, and Club activities in general.
  • To ensure that members adhere to Club rulings, policies, and expected models of conduct when dealing with other members or outsiders.
  • To defend Club members and Club property from outside threats.
  • To enforce Club rules.
  • To protect and serve the President.
  • Is the only Club Member allowed to break rank while riding to protect the Club.
  • Responsible for storing and maintaining Club paraphernalia (ex, Patches).

What does the Masonic Biker Club Road Captain do?

The executive duties of the road captain are as follows:

  • To plan the travel routes and organize the basic itinerary of the Club prior to going on a “Run”.
  • To lead the Club in formation during a run.
  • To enforce Club rules and procedures for group riding.
  • The Road Captain is in charge while riding.

What does the Masonic Biker Tail Gunner do?

The executive duties of the tail gunner are as follows:

  • To follow and start the requested action from the Road Captain when safe to do so.
  • To assist in Club safety when performing road maneuvers.

As the website author, I am spending hours researching article topics and answering popular questions readers think about.  Take time to read more articles on Masonic Gear or Freemasonry 101 to learn more about the Freemason fraternity now. Thanks!

 

How should I dress when visiting a Freemason Lodge for the first time?

How should I dress when visiting a Freemason Lodge for the first time?
Freemasonry Report - Square and Compass
Freemasonry Report – Visiting a Freemason Lodge

How should I dress when visiting a Freemason Lodge for the first time?

My thoughts on visiting a Freemason Lodge to make a good first impression

So many times men are uncomfortable visiting a Masonic Lodge.  One of the big reasons, they are this way is because they don’t know what to wear.

Hopefully this article can help a potential candidate to consider what to wear on the first visit to a lodge. My recommendation is call the lodge officers: Worshipful Master, Secretary, Senior Warden or Junior Warden. These officers will be able to answer this question, but what if you can’t get a hold of these officers – what should you do next?

Freemason Lodge First Impression
Freemason Lodge First Impression

Consider Your First Impression when visiting a lodge for the first time

My advice is be over dressed versus under dressed for the occasion. Some lodges wear tuxedos for only the officers while others all the members must be dressed in a tux. Other lodges, enjoy a casual attire – polo shirts and suit pants.

Yet, I have seen others where dark suits where considered appropriate attire. My reaction is simple – this is an interview between yourself and the lodge brothers.  You both want to make the right first impression to each other.

So here is my suggestion on what to wear to your first Masonic Meeting! (Here are My Freemason Lodge First Impression Ideas)

A Man’s Masonic First Meeting Attire Advice from a Past Master of a Blue Lodge

Here are examples of appropriate outfits for men going to a regular meeting. Potential candidates should always default to wearing a suit. All clothes should fit well and be free of stains.

  1.   If you go with a suit go with a conservative solid color:
    • navy
    • black
    • dark grey
  2. Think about wearing a long sleeved shirt that is white, light blue, or color coordinated with the suit
  3. Wear a Leather belt that matches your suit
  4. Wear a Tie
  5. Wear dark socks and conservative leather shoes that compliment the suit
  6. Consider wearing a nice watch but try to limit the amount of jewelry to just a few pieces
  7. Get a good haircut that makes you look neat and professional
  8. Limited amount of aftershave and/cologne
  9. Neatly trim your fingernails
  10. Bring a portfolio with a pen to take notes and place Masonic Brochures and Business Cards into
  11. Carry Breathe Mints in your pocketHow should I dress when visiting a Freemason Lodge for the first time?

A Man’s Masonic First Meeting Attire Advice for a less formal or informal meeting

 

Here are few examples of appropriate outfit attire for a less formal event or meeting. Potential candidates should always default to wearing a sport coat.

  1. Go with a traditional Blue Blazer
  2. Wear Khaki Pants
  3. Select a leather belt that compliments the leather shoes
  4. Go for socks that match the khaki pants
  5. Wear a button down shirt – blue, white, or a color that is complimentary of the Blue Blazer
  6. Make certain your hairstyle matches your conservative attire
  7. Bring a pocket calendar and a pen to write down upcoming activities and/or notes
  8. Of course breathe mints in case the food is spicy and could leave you with bad breathe

Here are few examples of appropriate outfit attire for a informal event or meeting. Potential candidates should always default to wearing a sport coat.

  1. Go with a traditional Blue Blazer
  2. Wear a polo shirt and keep it tucked in to your pants
  3. Wear Khaki Pants or khaki shorts if it is an outdoor summertime event
  4. Select a leather belt that compliments the leather shoes or top slider style footwear
  5. Go for socks that compliment the khakis
  6. Make certain your hairstyle matches your conservative attire
  7. Bring your smart phone to jot down upcoming activities or to take notes with
  8. Of course breathe mints and share them with the brothers – it is a good conversation starter plus it shows you are a person who likes to share
How should I dress when visiting a Freemason Lodge for the first time?
How should I dress when visiting a Freemason Lodge for the first time?

Tips for Millennials wanting to become Masons – Visiting a Freemason Lodge & Making a First Impression

  • Gum is okay but don’t chew with your mouth open or snap the gum – if you can’t remember to do that – dump it.
  • Coffee – bring it and enjoy it. Alot of Masons love coffee so it is a great conversation starter
  • Soda – bring it and enjoy it but remember to ask about recycling the can or bottle before you throw it in the trash can. Masons like to help keep the environment in good shape too.
  • If you have lots of piercings, be prepared to talk about them, Some older Freemasons probably want to learn about why you have them or so many of them
  • If you have tattoos, don’t cover them up. These are seen as ‘cool’ to alot of Freemasons and they will want to see them and share their tattoos as well.  I know a bunch of Masons with Square and Compass Tattoos as well as Scottish Rite Tattoos also

Tips for Busy Professionals wanting to become Masons – Visiting a Freemason Lodge & Making a good First Impression

  • Wear your business attire to the first meeting
  • Add a little fresh deodorant prior to arriving
  • Bring business cards so the Lodge Brothers can follow up with you
  • Take time after the first meeting to send a thank you card / email to people you have met at the meeting

I hope this article helped you with getting ready for your first Masonic Meeting and what you should wear – now get ready to make new friends in Freemasonry. And continue to enjoy the Freemasonry Report!

Masonic Ring – Should I get one Freemason ring or more than one ring?

Should I get one Freemason ring or more than one ring?

Masonic Ring – Should I get one Freemason ring or more than one ring?

Should I get one Freemason ring or more than one ring?
Should I get one Freemason ring or more than one ring?

Your first masonic ring is always special.  It represents the beginning of your life in Freemasonry.  Some Masons do have more than one ring. Each is special and has important meaning to them.  This article hopes to identify how many rings is good to own and possibly wear at one time.  As a Master Mason myself, I own 3 or 4 Masonic style rings. My first Masonic ring was gold with a blue stone.  I gifted it to my father when he was raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason.  It was an honorable present for him from me.  Many family members do this gifting of Masonic Rings from Grandfathers to Grandsons & Fathers to Sons. Thus having multiple rings does happen.

 

I have friends in Masonry that are collectors of Masonic Rings too. They have York Rite, Shrine, Scottish Rite, and Blue Lodge Freemason rings.  One of my good friends from the Scottish Valley has a wedding style ring with all the different appendant bodies he belongs too on it. Another of my good friends from my mother (original) blue lodge makes his own rings from extra gold. Yet, another brother which I chat with regularly only wears his Past Master Ring and I myself for years have decided not even wear a ring.  It varies based on the Mason.

What is a good first Masonic Ring?

The Masonic Ring and the symbols on it are the most recognized emblems of the Masons. It is worn on the third finger of the right hand in most cases. Yet, some

Gold Masonic Ring
Gold Masonic Ring

Freemasons wear them on the thumb, pinky finger, or pointer finger.  Remember, only Masons should wear a Masonic ring and each lodge has it’s own traditions for the rings too.

These Masonic Rings can be silver, steel, tungsten, or gold are the most popular options. Some masonic rings are most often handmade jewelry, as the masons are considered highly skilled trade workers. But, lesser quality metals generally are not handmade and they come regular finger sizes. I got a tungsten ring at a Grand Lodge Communication one year and it was sized at each normal finger size. So, it was sized 9,10, 11, 12, 13, and so on. But, they didn’t sale 11.5,12.5,13.5, and so on. Which caused me to select a ring that turned out to be alttile to tight on my finger versus a comfortable fit. Hence, I stopped wearing it and gave it away to a brother in my lodge. My advice is to get a custom made ring so you know it fits perfectly.

What is the meaning behind it?

Well, in the degrees – the symbolism is explained in great detail. But, for newbies or non-Masons, I will give you the cliff notes of the rings meaning. It represents the manual working tools of stonemasons. A masonic ring features a compass and a square with sometimes a letter “G” is on it’s center point. The exact meaning of the “G” is taught in the degree work. The debate is fun to read on various websites that claim to know it’s meaning – you may find many different answers online. But any good Master Mason knows the true answer and he keeps it safely within his heart.

Did you know, some Grand Lodges don’t use the “G” with the square and compass. Therefore, there are Masonic Rings without the ‘G’ entirely. Other appendant bodies substitute the “G” for a Hebrew Letter. Yet, some master jewelers make fancy one of kind rings with other symbols in the square and compass such as the the skull and bones. Some masons love to invest in these fine pieces of art and enjoy showing them off when out in the community or at a lodge meeting. The truth is that speculative masonry was born out of the operative craft. So the symbols from the operative masons were made use of by modern Freemasonry.

The history of the Freemasons is a long and highly symbolic one. Dating back to the 14th century, the original purpose was to regulate the qualifications of stonemasons; your position in the organization ranked how good a mason you were, be it an apprentice, journeymen, or master mason. Today, the Masons are considered the world’s largest fraternity. While each Masonic Grand Lodge exists and operates according to a set of ancient principles, known as the Landmarks of Freemasonry, these principles have far eluded any universally accepted definition. Each particular lodge within a Grand Lodge also has it’s own bylaws to function according to Masonic Law. When it comes to the Masonic ring, does the same holds true? Not exactly, very few Grand Lodges or Lodges have set Masonic Law to how a brother mason should have and wear his ring in. Each brother is free to wear or not wear a ring. Furthermore, each masonic ring may have a very different meaning between one brother and another. However, the ring itself, regardless of the meanings of each part, should only to be worn by a Freemason.

Alot of Freemasons get different rings stone colors.

The color of stone behind the square and compass on a red has meaning too. Beyond looking really cool if the ring has a stone, it is typically either a blue, red, or black onyx. The Blue stone represents the blue lodge in freemasonry. Some brothers believe it can also represent water or revitalization, and it can re-energize all aspects of yourself. Personally I think that any answer beyond the blue lodge is totally made up unless a brother can point to the degree work. I have heard that blue is represents a highly dedicated worker in a blue lodge. But I find this idea to be nonsense because many Masonic brethren were this color stone ring and don’t regularly attend lodge.

Wedding Style Masonic Ring
Wedding Style Masonic Ring

Moving on to red stone masonic rings, it represents Red Lodges in some areas and to some brothers the fourth degree in Freemasonry – Royal Arch Masonry. If you want to learn more about the Royal Arch – check my article on York Rite Freemasonry. I spent writing that article and it is very informative, so check it out after you finish reading this one!   But wait, to other Master Masons, the red stone stands for being a member of the Shrine! Fine jewelers love to make up fantastic stories of  red stones are for inner power that is said to give you strength to take risks and try new things or that you will passionately die for the fraternity. Personally, I think that is just good marketing to make a Freemason hopefully excited want to buy the ring.  The black stones, diamond encrusted, and other colors are style purposes only. But remember, it is your ring so you can tie any meaning to the color if you want, I recommend trying to dig something up from the degree work so other brothers will look at you as a man with a good memory of his favorite part of a degree.

Either way, the stone color matters little to me because a masonic ring symbolizes several concepts for Master Mason. The circular nature of the ring demonstrates the circle. This circle represents to some brethren the bond one has to the brotherhood of freemasonry, in the same way that wedding rings show a bond of one person to another. By wearing a Masonic Ring, you are offering the world a visual sign of your Mason Obligation and membership in the fraternity.

What is a Masonic Signet Ring?

Honestly, this is an amazing style ring to get.  I own one myself and I am thinking about getting another one too!  A true Masonic signet ring is used as a seal to validate the authenticity of its owner. The word “Signet” comes from the word “Sign” meaning that the ring provides a symbol, a sign or a signature to officially stamp or mark important documents.

Seal of Authentication: While we are unsure of the exact date that Masonic rings began to be worn by the fraternity, Signet rings have been a part of religion in many cultures throughout history. In past eras, Signet rings were worn by Kings, Popes, Bishops, Roman Emperors and other high ranking church officials and noblemen as a sign of their nobility, importance and power. Probably the most famous religious signet ring in the world, today, is worn by the Pope. The Pope’s ring is called the “Fisherman’s Ring”, a very beautiful ornate gold seal ring, which denotes the seal of his authority. Upon the Pope’s death, the Cardinals break his ring and a new signet ring is created for each new succeeding Pope. Papal rings can never be pre-owned, it is not only considered unacceptable, but an abomination and therefore profane.

Did you know that the Masonic use of the word profane means: Pro = without , Fanum = temple. Literally, it denotes a person outside the temple….or a person who has not been initiated. Therefore, a signet ring distinguished an individual as one of: a high social standing, a member of a society, a symbolic certification of who they are, what they stand for, a military distinction, a family coat of arms, or a religious belief. The purpose of the ring which is to be used to seal mark the dignity and importance of its wearer.

In other words they provided a visual authenticity proving that the wearer was not only truly who he said he was, but they symbolized his power in the community. At one time in history, the theft of a signet ring was punishable by death. While originally only worn by royalty, religious officials and noblemen, as time passed, tradesmen and merchants, too began wearing these rings. While royal signet rings were lavishly decorated with precious metals, rich enamels and gems of every color and facet, the tradesmen and merchants’ signet rings had mottoes or logos cut into them.

Should you get a Signet Ring to add to your Masonic Ring collection?

Maybe, if you are into that type of ring. Let’s consider how the Masonic Signet Ring is made first. Okay so, the basic ring is first created without any ornaments upon its face. Generally it’s an over sized flat metal surface. The surface is cut with an imprint of the symbol or symbols which the wearer wishes to display. This is really cool because you can customize your Masonic Ring to your liking if you dealing with a Signet Ring Maker directly.  This symbol is, in most cases the Masonic square and compasses, with the Letter G at its center.  A true Masonic Signet Ring leaves a raised (positive) design upon the material onto which it is pressed, (usually wax). When pressed into the soft material, the material is forced into the incised area of the Masonic ring’s face and this creates the raised image design on the material being stamped. The jeweler should be able to offer you, the opposite of a cameo (raised face) type of ring, which leaves a depressed design in the wax.  And that is pretty stinking cool, hence why I own one – do I use it for it’s intended purpose? Nope.

Fraternal Masonic Rings Are Fun To Have Different Styles for Different Occasions

Freemasons proudly wear their mason rings as a symbol of their ongoing obligation of loyalty, their brotherhood and as a visual statement that they are a member of the oldest fraternity on Earth. In the United States, it may take some time to receive a Master Mason’s degree, but that just gives a new brother more time to shop for a cool ring to wear. Within most U.S. jurisdictions in the United States, members may receive their Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft and Master Mason degrees within a few months. Therefore, it’s up to the Worshipful Master of a particular lodge to allow an Entered Apprentice and Fellow Craft to wear a Masonic Ring.

But, upon completion of their Master Mason degree, they are now entitled to display their authenticity as being raised to the Sublime Degree of Master Mason. Thus, by being gifted or purchasing and wearing a masonic ring. Freemasonry is a society of many secrets shrouded in esoteric symbols. The masonic ring is one of the outward displays of freemasonry that features these signs. Wearing the ring of a mason encourages a certain social etiquette. The following is a description of the ways for wearing them.

Hand Full Of Masonic Rings
Hand Full Of Masonic Rings

How to Wear a Masonic Ring – On which finger should I wear my Masonic ring?  There is no right or wrong finger or right or wrong hand on which to wear your Masonic Signet Ring. Most married men wear them on the opposite hand from which they wear a wedding ring…usually on their 3rd finger. They are also popularly worn on the pinky / little finger.

How to Wear a Masonic Ring – Which direction should the Square and Compasses face?  This ring isn’t the Irish claddagh ring. Wearing it one way versus another doesn’t mean your single. Nor does it mean your officer in the lodge or not. Nor does it matter if the 2 ends of the Compass point toward you or away from you.  This subject is one on which Grand Lodges have made no regulation because they have more important details of the fraternity to deal with.  Popular opinion seems to be widely divided because the decisions of the Worshipful Master only last for a brief period of time and then a new one comes in to run a particular lodge.

Just wear the ring the way you want to. You can use reference points, such as when the emblem of the square and compasses is displayed on a building, or a button, universal custom requires that the points of the compasses point downward. But, you could use how it displayed on the Altar in the lodge as another reference point. While you may wear your ring with the 2 legs of the compasses pointing toward you if you enjoy looking at the Masonic Logo. Other brothers say it a way to share that you are Master Mason to the world and the world should enjoy looking at the Masonic Logo. If you have a signet ring, then 2 legs of the compasses should, therefore, face away from you, so you can imbed the image of their “seal” into the wax…so that the resulting waxen seal which was created by the ring has both legs of the compasses pointing downward.

Other Masonic Rings to invest in…
  • Knights Templar Ring – A symmetrical cross in the center. This ring signifies freemasonry’s lineage claim to the Knights Templar, who protected Christian crusaders on pilgrimages to the Holy Land.
  • The Scottish Rite – A mix of symbols of the degrees
  • The Shrine Ring – The Shrine ring displays a sword and a crescent.
  • The Royal Arch Ring – Triangle with a triple Tau
  • The 14th Degree Ring – a plain band of gold with an equilateral triangle enclosing the Hebrew letter Yud. The inside typically reads, “Whom virtue unites, death will not separate.”
  • The 32nd Degree Ring – Double Eagle Symbol
  • The 33rd Degree Ring – 33 in a triangle (if and when you become one)
  • The Past Master – compasses with a rocker (if and when you become one)

As there are many variations of freemasonry, there are also many different kinds of rings.These include Blue Lodge, Eastern Star and other appendant bodies too – I hope this blog article inspired you to enjoy Freemasonry more or possibly to join the fraternity. Lastly, only a master mason should wear a ring.

What is York Rite Freemasonry?

What is York Rite Freemasonry
What is York Rite Freemasonry
What is York Rite Freemasonry

What is York Rite Freemasonry?

What is York Rite Freemasonry?… Good news I have the answer for you! The York Rite (or the American Rite) is one of two popular Freemason Rites in the USA. the other being the Scottish Rite. The Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite claims to hold the power of conferring the first three degrees of Masonry in addition to those under its jurisdiction but the York Rite does not.   York Rite is flavored with more of a Christian message, but is open to all denominations.  Freemasonry in the York Rite is based on the early remnants of Craft Masonry that were practiced in the early 1700’s. All brothers in the York Rite are Master Masons. No York Rite Mason can be a Fellowcraft or Entered Apprentice – they all must be 3rd Degree Freemasons.

Why is that important?  The first Grand Lodge of England in 1717 specified that the lodges were to confer only the degrees of Entered Apprentice, Fellowcraft, and Master Mason or the first three degrees of Freemasonry. The thinking was that all other degrees being considered spurious. However, many lodges had been conferring other degrees that they considered an integral part of Masonry. In 1751, the Masons of these ‘spurious’ degrees formed their own Grand Lodge for the purpose of conferring the Royal Arch Degree. These Masons called themselves the “Antients” and the other Grand Lodge founded in 1717 were called the “Moderns.” York Rite Masonry, which takes its name from the old English city of York in the United Kingdom has been described as the oldest and purest of the Rites.

Within York Rite Masonry, the Royal Arch Degree is described as the Master Mason’s Degree completed. This is due to the fact that up until 1767, the Master Mason Degree of the Blue Lodge contained the secrets of the Royal Arch. Nowadays, these same secrets form a part of the teachings of the Royal Arch.  In England, the Royal Arch Mason degree is automatically included in the Master Mason’s Degree.

Freemasonry Report - Square and Compass
Freemasonry Report – Square and Compass

It took close to 75 years before the two Grand Lodge decided to merge.  In 1813, it was official that merger of the two Grand Lodges would become the United (known by some as: Mother vs. United) Grand Lodge of England.  This new Grand Lodge had all the particular lodges agree that only the three accepted degrees of Masonry would be used.  Further, the degree of the Royal Arch would be attached to Chapters allied directly to these lodges. Thus, the Chapter and Lodge would have and use the same number even it was a separate body. Also in 1813, the United Grand Lodge of England stated it in no uncertain terms: “Ancient Craft Masonry consists of three degrees and no more, namely, those of the Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft and Master Mason including the Holy Royal Arch.” It is a natural progression of the Freemasonry’s primary theme. Therefore, brothers who are in the York Rite have rightfully acknowledged the fact that they are considered appendant body to those of Ancient Craft Masonry. It is still the practice in English Masonry that a Masonic member is not considered to be in possession of all the degrees of Ancient Craft Masonry until he has been exalted to the Royal Arch.

Did you know that in England. no other degree has been officially recognized by the United Grand Lodge? Why because to that Grand Lodge it is a landmark remains to this day. No additional Rites and Degrees can be bestowed upon a Master Mason until he has received the Royal Arch Degree. It is logical actually because a man is not a Master Mason until he receives the Master’s Word. This is something a Mason can only receive in the Royal Arch. Within Capitular Masonry are contained the essentials of symbolism, allegory, and philosophy that a Master Mason requires in order to understand those teachings which have only been partially given to him in the Blue Lodge.

Why is it called the American Rite by some Masons if it was founded in England?

Why do some Freemasons call the York Rite the American Rite? Well, in the early days of the American Colonies and the founding our the nation which would become the USA. Some American Lodges operated in a similar manner until the establishment of the General Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons. The Sublime Degree of Master Mason is often thought of as the ultimate degree of Freemasonry. However, many Masonic scholars agree that there is more to story as illustrated in the three degrees and that the first three degrees are not the whole story. The Degrees of York Rite Masonry complete the story and provide answers to many questions that the newly-raised Master Mason may have. Therefore, in the USA, an individual Chapter is not directly connected to an individual lodge but more of a territory of multiple lodges which have simply indirect ties.

For a period in US history, the Cryptic degrees were controlled by various state Grand Chapter jurisdictions, until the establishment of the General Grand Council. The Chivalric Orders have been controlled by the Grand Encampment since the early 19th century in the United States. All three bodies are technically autonomous Masonic entities, only the requirement of membership in the Royal Arch connecting the Cryptic degrees and Chivalric Orders together. Many are found in other jurisdictions outside of the United States, but several are uniquely American in their origin.

Is York Rite Freemasonry a religion?

What is York Rite Freemasonry
What is York Rite Freemasonry

Like other forms of Masonry, the York Rite is not a religion. Nevertheless, it does develop Biblical themes in addition to themes based on the Medieval Crusades. In the York Rite, any Master Mason may become a member of three bodies — actually a group of separate Rites joined in order. These include: a Chapter of Royal Arch Masons; a Council of Royal and Select Masters; a Commandery of Knights Templar. Appendant to the York Rite Bodies are several additional Masonic bodies, most of which are invitational in nature. Membership in many of them is predicated on membership in the Royal Arch, though some have memberships predicated on other bodies of the York Rite, or membership in all of the York Rite bodies.

Knight Templars in the York Rite are not a religion either.  The Knights Templar is a Christian-oriented fraternal organization that is based on the history and myths surrounding the 11th century Order. Originally, the Knights Templar were laymen who protected and defended Christians traveling to Jerusalem. These men took vows of poverty, chastity and obedience, and were renowned for their fierceness and courage in battle.  Today, the Knights Templar display their courage and goodwill in other ways. They organize fund-raising activities such as breakfasts, dinners, dances, and flea markets. They support Masonic-related youth groups and they raise millions of dollars for medical research and educational assistance. Currently, Templar membership consists of members from all walks of life, including doctors, lawyers, clergy, businessmen and entertainment personalities, all of whom profess a belief in the Christian Religion. The Knights Templar operates on a local, state and national level. But their religious activities extend across international borders as well. Nationally, there is The Grand Encampment of Knights Templar. This unit defines the rituals and laws governing state and local level organizations.

What are the degrees of York Rite Freemasonry?

The York Rite provides additional Masonic teachings and confers additional relevant degrees. It is organized as follows: Royal Arch Freemasonry, The Holy Royal Arch, Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, Mark Master, Virtual Past Master,  Most Excellent Master, and Royal Arch Mason – R :. A :. M :;  Cryptic Masonry, Council of the Royal and Select Masters, Royal Master, Select Master, and Super-Excellent Master; Commandery of Knights Templar, Order of the Red Cross, Order of the Knights of Malta, and Order of the Knights Templar.

But please be aware that the degrees included within the framework of Royal Arch Freemasonry of York Rite Freemasonry  are: The Mark Master Mason degree, which is sometimes said to be expansion of the Fellow Crafts’ second degree. The Past Master degree is bestowed because of the old requirement that only Past Masters of a Symbolic Lodge may join the Royal Arch. Now in the present day , it is a virtual degree created to conform with tradition, and it confers no rights as a Past Master in a Blue Lodge. The Most Excellent Master degree, wherein the building of King Solomon’s Temple has been completed. The Royal Arch Mason degree, said by many to be the most beautiful degree in all of Freemasonry. By joining the York Rite, a Master Mason may proceed to supplement and expand upon the degrees of the Blue Lodge.

York Rite Freemasonry begins with the Royal Arch Chapters. Councils of Cryptic Masons form the center body of the York Rite of Freemasonry. A Master Mason may join a Chapter of Royal Arch Masons and receive the four degrees of that organization. After which he may seek further knowledge in Freemasonry and join a Council of Cryptic Masons. The Commandery of Knight Templar is the final set of degrees and all members need to have received the Chapter and Council degrees prior to joining a commandery.

The symbolism of the Royal Arch picks up where the Symbolic Lodge leaves off. The symbolism of the Blue Lodge degrees emphasizes the building of King Solomon’s. Royal Arch Masonry (known as Capitular Masonry) continues in this vein by emphasizing symbols and allegories of the Second Temple, the Ark of the Covenant, further symbolism of Solomon’s temple completed, and the Lost Word (also called the Master’s Word) — which is given to the Royal Arch Mason. This is one reason why the Royal Arch Degrees are first for every Master Mason to experience in the York Rite.

The Capitular Degrees of York Rite Freemasonry

The Capitular Degrees are a set of four degrees controlled by the Royal Arch Chapter. They center on the construction phases of Solomon’s Temple, with the exception of the degree of Past Master, hence the title of Capitular. The degree of Past Master is the vestigial remnant of the former custom that the degree of the Royal Arch could only be conferred on a Past Master of a Symbolic Blue Lodge. In the United States, these degrees are considered as proprietary to the Royal Arch, while in England there is no Past Master degree as found here, and the Mark Master degree is controlled by its own Grand Lodge. The Most Excellent Master degree is also part of the Cryptic Degree in England. As stated in the forward, the Royal Arch overseas is controlled by Chapters attached to English Blue Lodges. The Royal Arch Chapters have occasionally been referred to as the “Red lodge” in older Masonic publications, though they should more accurately be described as the “Red degrees.” In the United States, all Chapter business is conducted in a Royal Arch Chapter, the other bodies being only opened for the conferral of degrees. Some jurisdictions open Mark Master Lodges as “table lodges,” which act as a social focus for the local York Rite bodies

  • Mark Master – A Degree that emphasizes the lessons of regularity, discipline, and integrity. It is a most impressive Degree centered on the story of the Fellowcraft of the quarry and their role in the building of the Temple. Its importance in English Craft Masonry can be judged by the fact that it operates as a separate Grand Lodge, and is highly sought by members of the Craft in that jurisdiction.
  • Past Master (Virtual) A Degree that emphasizes the lesson of harmony. This Degree is conferred because ancient custom required that a Mason must be a Past Master in order to be exalted to the Royal Arch. In some Grand Jurisdictions this Degree is conferred upon all sitting Masters of the Blue Lodge. The Degree confers no actual rank upon the recipient, but is exemplified to maintain the ancient custom.
  • Most Excellent Master – A Degree that emphasizes the lesson of reverence. This Degree is centered on the dedication of the Temple after its completion, particularly the consecration of the Sanctum Sanctorum and the descent of the Host into the Temple. It is complimentary to the Mark Master Degree and completes the symbolic lessons introduced in that Degree.
  • The Royal Arch – The completion of the Master Mason Degree and the summit of the original Degrees of the Blue Lodge as practiced in the Antients Lodges of England before 1820. The Degree explains the origins of the Substitute Word found in the Master Mason Degree, the recovery of the Ineffable Word, and its concealment within the Royal Arch Word. This Degree, together with the Master Mason Degree, may have once been exemplified as one large or “super” Degree, with the Master Mason Degree explaining the loss of the Master’s Word and the Royal Arch explaining the recovery of the Master’s Word. The presiding body is a Chapter, and the presiding officer is a High Priest (titled Excellent).

In architectural symbolism, the capstone is the crowing stone of an entire structure or wall. It is for this reason that Royal Arch Masonry is called “the Capstone of Ancient Craft Masonry” or the Capitular Rite.

After the degrees of Royal Arch Masonry, the second set of degrees within York Rite Masonry encompasses the degrees of the Council of Royal and Select Masters. These degrees expound upon the Royal Arch degree and, to a lesser extent, the Master Mason degree. They are often said to be among Masonry’s most beautiful and impressive ceremonies, complete one’s education in Ancient Craft Masonry. The degrees of the Council comprise what is called Cryptic Masonry or the Cryptic Rite because a crypt or underground room figures prominently in the degrees. The symbolic foundation of these rites is the subterranean Vault constructed by King Solomon as a stockpile for certain secret knowledge which was guarded by a select priesthood.

The degrees of the Council include:

  1. The Royal Master degree examines in more detail the story of recovery of the “lost” word and the Holy of Holies of the Temple of King Solomon.
  2. The Select Master degree is concerned with the construction and embellishment of the subterranean vault introduced in the Royal Arch degree of the Chapter.
  3. The Super Excellent Master degree concerns the story of the Babylonian Captivity, and of Zedekiah and his betrayal.
  4. Through these ceremonies, a Mason learns more details concerning the building of the first temple. He discovers why the word was lost, and the secret of its preservation and recovery.

One of the most vivid occurs during the Super Excellent Master degree contains an impressive dramatizations of truth and fidelity. The degrees of the Cryptic Rite emphasize teachings that are instructive for a positive and gratifying life: “Let uprightness and integrity attend your steps; let justice and mercy mark their conduct, let fervency and zeal stimulate you in the discharge of the various duties incumbent on you.”

The Cryptic Degrees of York Rite Freemasonry

The Cryptic Degrees are a set of three degrees controlled by the Select Masters Council. The degrees get their name from the reference to a hidden or secret vault in the degrees, hence the term Cryptic. Only the first two degrees are regularly worked, the third degree, that of Super Excellent Master, is worked as an honorary degree, not being required as a requisite for membership in the Council. It is also somewhat peculiar in its association with the Cryptic degrees, as it is more closely allied in theme and character with the Royal Arch and the Illustrious Order of the Red Cross.

The history of the body as a whole is also shrouded in uncertainty and controversy. Though there is early evidence of Councils of Royal and Select Masters being worked in the United States, the degrees were worked variously by their own Councils, Royal Arch Chapters, and even Lodges of Perfection of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. Though the Scottish Rite has long relinquished any claim to these degrees, several Grand Jurisdictions (Virginia & West Virginia) still confer them as a part of Capitular Masonry. In England, the degree of Most Excellent Master is grouped with this body. In the United States, all business is conducted in the Select Masters Council, the other two bodies only being opened for the conferral of degrees. Some jurisdictions hold “table councils” in similar manner to “table lodges” as a social focal point of their local York Rite bodies.

  • Royal Master –  A Degree emphasizing the lessons of patience and fortitude. The Degree centers around the Fellowcraft Masons who were artificers fabricating the fittings and furniture of the Temple. It is unusual in that the first part of the Degree depicts events taking place before the death of the Grand Master Hiram Abiff, and the last part depicts events occurring after his death.
  • Select Master – A Degree emphasizing the lessons of devotion and zeal. The Degree centers on the construction and furnishing of a Secret Vault beneath the Sanctum Sanctorum of the Temple, and the deposition of those secrets pertaining to the Craft by the three ancient Grand Masters of the Craft. This Degree bridges the events surrounding the concealment and loss of the Ineffable Word and the events leading to the recover of the Word in the Royal Arch Degree. The presiding body is a Council, and the presiding officer is a Master (titled Illustrious).
  • Super Excellent Master – A Degree emphasizing the lessons of loyalty and faithfulness. The Degree centers around the events leading to the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple at the hands of the Chaldeans. The Degree is narrated by small interludes of biblical prophecy that highlight the end of the first Temple and the construction of the second Temple. It is noteworthy for its scenes of the Jewish court of Zedekiah and the Chaldean court of Nebuchadnezzar. This degree is an honorary one, and a member of the Council not needing to have it in order to hold membership or office.

The rich history of York Rite Masonry is undeniable. The York Rite is historically the oldest and purest of the appendant Rites. Every Master Mason should be fascinated by the lessons and mysteries of Freemasonry provided by the Blue Lodge. Hopefully, all Master Masons will consider those lessons and mysteries available in the York Rite of Freemasonry — in order to complete their Masonic knowledge and the teachings that are mentioned as landmarks of the Master Mason. All brother Masons should be advised to continue their historical and educational view of Masonry. Every Master Mason should be a member of the Royal Arch, and every Christian Mason should be a Knights Templar. The state groups are organized into A Grand Commandery of Knights Templar. This organization represents members of a state or an area of equivalent size.

The Knights Templar contains three degrees called Orders which elucidate a Christian interpretation of Freemasonry:

  1. The Illustrious Order of the Red Cross illustrates the preparations for building a second Temple.
  2. The Order of the Knights of Malta (or simply Order of Malta) explains the history of the Knights of Malta, relates the story of Paul’s arrival on the island of Malta. It is a Christian Order that seeks to perpetuate ideals of love and mercy.
  3. The Order of the Temple. The Order of Malta and the Order of the Temple have a Christian orientation and their teachings are based upon the crusades of the original Knights Templar.
  4. The Knights Templar is based upon the practice of the Christian virtues, moral values and spiritual lessons. Members are urged to live their lives as Christian Knights.

The completion of the York Rite Bodies is the Commandery of Knights Templar—the degrees of which comprise what is known as Chivalry Masonry because they are based upon the Chivalric Orders of knighthood that fought to protect Christian pilgrims in the Holy Land during the Middle Ages. Unlike other Masonic bodies which only require a belief in a Supreme Being regardless of religion, membership in Knights Templar is open only to Royal Arch Masons who promise to defend the Christian faith. Local level groups are called Commanderies of Knights Templar.

Grand Encampment, KT, USA of York Rite Freemasonry

The Chivalric Orders are a set of three Orders culminating in the grade of Knight Templar, and controlled by that body. This body is markedly different from its foreign counterparts, in that it exhibits a paramilitary structure and outlook on Masonry, being the only branch of Masonry in the world that is a uniformed body. Its requirement that its members be professed Christians has led to calls of condemnation from other Masonic bodies and organizations both inside and outside the United States, claiming that the body is more of a Christian organization rather than a Masonic body. These have had little effect on the body, however, as many of the organizations criticizing the body have similar degrees among themselves.

The American body is also arranged different from its nearest relatives in England. The American body includes the Illustrious Order of the Red Cross, which is not conferred in any other organization, though it has very close cousins in the Irish and American Order of Knight Masons and in the English Allied Masonic Degrees grade of the Red Cross of Babylon. Also, in the United States, the Order of Malta is conferred on members before being eligible to receive the Order of the Temple, whereas in England, the Order of Malta is an honorary grade bestowed on Knights Templar. In the United States, all business is transacted in the Order of the Temple, the other bodies only being opened for the conferral of the Orders. In England, the Order of Malta meets and operates as a separate body in addition to the Order of the Temple.

Illustrious Order of the Red Cross – An Order emphasizing the lesson of truth. Elements of this Order were practiced in Ancient Lodges before the final form of the Master Mason Degree came into use. It is still practiced in the full ceremonial form by the Knight Masons of Ireland and the Knight Masons of the United States, and as the Red Cross of Babylon in the English Order of the Allied Masonic Degrees.

 

Order of Malta – An Order emphasizing the lesson of faith. This Order requires the Mason to profess and practice the Christian faith. The pass degree of the Mediterranean Pass, or Knight of St. Paul prepares the candidate for the Order by introducing the lesson and example of the fearless and faithful martyr of Christianity. The Order is centered on allegorical elements of the Knights of Malta, inheritors of the medieval Knights Hospitaller.

 

Order of the Temple – An Order emphasizing the lessons of self-sacrifice and reverence. It is meant to rekindle the spirit of the medieval Knights Templar devotion and self-sacrifice to Christianity. The history of the Masonic Order is long and convoluted, with the Order’s ritual differing between that conferred in England and in the United States. That practiced in the United States has a slight militant zeal to the lesson of Christianity, whereas the English ritual is more allegorical. However, the American ritual is most impressive, and more emphasis is placed on the solemnity and reverence associated with the Crucifixion, Resurrection, and Ascension of Christ. The presiding body is a Commandery, and the presiding officer is a Commander (titled Eminent). Local level groups are called Commanderies of Knights Templar.

Chair Degrees in York Rite Freemasonry

The “Chair Degrees” of York Rite masonry, so called as the candidate must be the installed or a past presiding officer of the respective York Rite body. They may also differ somewhat in name or character from one jurisdiction to another.

Order of High Priesthood – A chair degree conferred upon installed or past High Priests. Sometimes referred to as the Anointed Order of High Priesthood. In antiquity, this degree was known as the Order of Melchizedek.

 

Thrice Illustrious Master –  A chair degree conferred upon installed or past Illustrious Masters. It is also known as the Order of the Silver Trowel from the jewel of the degree.

 

 

Knight Crusader of the Cross –  A chair degree conferred upon installed or past Eminent Commanders.

 

 

Sovereign Order of Knights Preceptor –  All present and Past Commanders of Constituent and Subordinate Commanderies of the Grand Encampment of Knights Templar of the United States of America in a jurisdiction where there is not any Chapter of the Order may petition for membership in the Order of Knights Preceptor. The Grand Chapter of the Order of Knights Preceptor meets annually at the time and place of the Annual Meeting of the Grand Council of Allied Masonic Degrees of the United States of America.

What is Scottish Rite Freemasonry?

What is Scottish Rite Freemasonry
What is Scottish Rite Freemasonry by the Freemasonry Report
What is Scottish Rite Freemasonry by the Freemasonry Report

What is Scottish Rite Freemasonry?

The Scottish Rite is what many Master Masons call the “University of Freemasonry”. Scottish Rite Freemasonry begins once a Brother Mason has completed his 3rd Degree and is considered a Master Mason. It includes the degrees from the 4° to the 32°.  Each degree in the Scottish Rite has meaning and offers a life lesson to the brother.

Why do they use the word Scottish?

The use of the word “Scottish” has led many Masons to believe that the Rite originated in Scotland. There was also a false belief which persisted for many years, that a man had to go to Scotland to receive the 33°. Neither of these statements is true. Actually, the first reference to the Rite appears in old French records where the word “Ecossais,” meaning Scottish, is found. During the latter part of the 17th century, when the British Isles were torn by strife, many Scots fled to France and resumed their Masonic interests in that country. It is believed that this influence contributed to the use of the word “Scottish.”  In 1732, the first “Ecossais,” or Scottish Lodge was organized in Bordeaux, one of the oldest and most influential Masonic centers in France. The membership included Scottish and English members.

Scottish Rite Double Headed Eagle
Scottish Rite Double Headed Eagle

What is Scottish Rite Logo a Double Headed Eagle?

Did you know, that the double-headed eagle was probably first accepted as a symbol of Freemasonry in 1758. In that year the body calling itself the Council of Emperors of the East and West, was established in Paris. The double-headed eagle was in all probability adopted by this body, which claimed a double jurisdiction. The eagle, one head inclined to the East and the other to the West, to guard any and all who might approach from either direction.

The accepted symbol of our Rite is the Double-Headed Eagle of Lagash. It is the oldest crest in the world, according to fraternal scholars and was a symbol of power more than two thousand years before the building of King Solomon’s Temple. This impressive double-headed eagle features the white-ribboned motto, pendant from the hilt to the point of the sword, containing the words SPES MEA IN DEO EST, which translates My Hope Is In God.

At this early period, the French Masonic strongholds were in Bordeaux and Paris. On August 27, 1761, the French Grand Lodge at Paris (the Grand and Sovereign Lodge of St. John of Jerusalem), acting with a body of the superior degrees (the Council of the Emperors of the East and West, Sovereign Écossais Mother Lodge), issued a patent to Morin as a Grand Inspector, “authorizing and empowering him to establish perfect and sublime Masonry in all parts of the world.”  In 1761, certain Masonic authorities in France granted a patent to Stephen Morin of Bordeaux to carry the advanced degrees across the sea to America.

In 1763, Morin established these degrees in the French possessions in the West Indies. At that time, Morin promulgated a Masonic rite of 25 degrees which he called the “Order of the Royal Secret” or “Order of Prince of the Royal Secret” (sometimes Freemasons call it the “Rite of Perfection”).   What he established consisted of a system of 25 so-called higher degrees which flourished in France, and which were known as the “Rite of Perfection.”

Was there always 33 degrees in Freemasonry?

It was not until a few years after 1763, other degrees were added, until the Rite had a ritual structure of 33 degrees. The first three degrees being exemplified in a Symbolic Lodge, if a Grand Lodge with subordinate Lodges existed in the area.  Although it was once commonly believed that the Council of the Emperors of the East and West created the Order of the Royal Secret, recent research suggests that Morin was personally responsible for its organization. There also is compelling evidence that, to bolster his authority, he created and backdated documents known as the Constitutions and Regulations of 1762—an act that was not discovered for more than 220 years. About 1763, Morin introduced the Order of the Royal Secret to Kingston, Jamaica, and by 1764, high degrees were brought to North American soil, when they were established in New Orleans, Louisiana.

About this time, Morin empowered an enthusiastic Dutch Mason, Henry Andrew Francken, to establish Masonic Bodies throughout the New World, including the United States. In 1767, Henry Francken, who had been deputized by the Grand Inspector Morin. Soon after, Francken sailed to New York and organized a Lodge of Perfection in Albany, New York.  This was the forerunner of what was to become the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite in the United States., and in 1767, he began to confer the high degrees in Albany. Fortunately, he also transcribed several manuscript copies of the rituals of the Order of the Royal Secret, some of which survive today. These copies are known as the Francken Manuscripts.

How did the Scottish Rite Grow?

During the Colonial Period, other deputies, appointed by Morin, organized Masonic groups which conferred the advanced degrees at other important points along

What is Scottish Rite Freemasonry
What is Scottish Rite Freemasonry

the Atlantic seaboard, including Charleston, South Carolina.  On December 6, 1768, Francken appointed Moses Michael Hays (or Hayes), of Dutch parentage, a Deputy Inspector General of the Scottish Rite, for the West Indies and North America. The Hays patent granted authority to confer all the Degrees of Morin’s Order of the Royal Secret. The following year, Francken returned to Jamaica, and by 1780, Hays immigrated to Newport, Rhode Island. In 1781, Hays traveled to Philadelphia, where he met with eight Brethren whom he appointed Deputy Inspectors General over given American States, with the exception of Samuel Myers, who presided over the Leeward Islands in the West Indies in the Caribbean.

Barend Moses Spitzer, one of the Deputy Inspectors General, lived in Charleston, S.C., from 1770 to 1781 and moved to Philadelphia where he was appointed Deputy for Georgia and, after traveling briefly abroad, returned to Charleston by 1788. On April 2, 1795, Spitzer appointed the Irish-born John Mitchell, then living in Charleston, a Deputy Inspector General of the Order of the Royal Secret.  These groups were independent and without supervision or control; however, they all agreed that their authority came from Stephen Morin in Jamaica in the West Indies.

Why is the Supreme Council Important in Scottish Rite Freemasonry?

On May 31, 1801, the Supreme Council of the Thirty-third degree of the United States of America was established.  It was the first Scottish ‘Rite Supreme Council in the world. Further, it was founded in Charleston, South Carolina. The Supreme Council was a superior system to Morin’s Order of the Royal Secret; it administered 33 degrees, including all 25 of Morin’s rite. The traditional authority of the Supreme Council stems from the “Grand Constitution of the 33rd degree” (also Grand Constitutions of 1786), ostensibly ratified by Frederick II (“the Great”), King of Prussia.

It’s aim was to unify these competing groups and to bring Masonic order out of chaos. The full membership of this Supreme Council consisted of 11 Grand Inspectors General. Of these eleven brother Scottish Rite Freemasons included: John Mitchell, Frederick Dalcho, Abraham Alexander, Emanuel De La Motta, Thomas Bartholomew Bowen, Israel De Lieben, Isaac Auld, Le Compte Alexander Francois Auguste de Grasse, Jean Baptiste Marie Delahogue, Moses Clava Levy and James Moultrie. Did you know that nine Scottish Rite Freemasons were born abroad? Leaving only Brothers Isaac Auld and James Moultrie were native born citizens of the United States of America. In religious backgrounds of these brothers was vast as well, four were Jewish, five were Protestants, and two were Roman Catholics.

Why is there a Northern Scottish Rite and Southern Scottish Rite in the USA?

On August 4, 1813, Emanuel De La Motta,33°, of Savannah, Georgia, a distinguished Jewish merchant and philanthropist, and Grand Treasurer General of the Supreme Council at Charleston, organized in New York City the Supreme Council of the Thirty-third degree for the Northern District and Jurisdiction of the United States of America.

The first Sovereign Grand Commander was Daniel D. Tompkins, 33°. He filled this office from 1813-25. He was at the same time Vice President of the United States for two terms, under president Monroe. Both the Northern and Southern Jurisdictions were created to make progress in unifying the scattered degree-conferring groups, and in standardizing the rituals.

Freemasonry Report - Square and Compass
Freemasonry Report – Square and Compass

They unfortunately were handicapped by the pride in the local organizations; by leadership jealousies, the American Civil War and by other matters. The process of unification, however, was completed in the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction by the Union of 1867, when the last irregular Supreme Council finally acknowledged the authority of the regular Supreme Council. From that Union, there arose what is the present Supreme Council for the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction of the United States of America. The Northern Masonic Jurisdiction specifically covers the 15 states east of the Mississippi River and north of the Mason-Dixon Line and the Ohio river, including Delaware. Its headquarters is in Lexington, Massachusetts, a suburb of Boston.

At the present time, the Supreme Council for the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction officially recognizes and enjoys friendly relations with the Supreme Councils of the Scottish Rite in 39 other jurisdictions, and the higher degrees systems (Swedish Rite) administered by the Grand Lodges in the four Scandinavian countries, Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden). There are Scottish Rite centers, called “Valleys,” in 110 cities and towns in the fifteen states of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction.

The other Supreme Council in the United States is that of the Southern Jurisdiction. It has its headquarters at Washington, D.C., and covers the remaining 35 states, the district of Columbia, and the United States territories and possessions. Yet, it is now officially recognized as being established in 1801 in Charleston, South Carolina. Today, the Scottish Rite has spread throughout the world.

How important is a 33rd Freemason?

One important point which must be recognized by all Masons is the fact that the Scottish Rite shares the belief of all Masonic organizations that there is no higher degree than that of Master Mason. The Supreme Council and its subordinate bodies acknowledge the Masonic supremacy of the Symbolic Grand Lodges, and the Grand Master of Masons is recognized as the ranking Masonic officer present when in attendance at any Scottish Rite meeting.

The high degrees often were referred to as the Ineffable and Sublime (or Superior) Degrees. In the earliest days of the Scottish Rite, the high degrees were conferred only on Past Masters, or virtual Past Masters, of Blue Lodges.  The Scottish Rite degrees are in addition to and are in no way “higher” than the Blue Lodge degrees. Scottish Rite work amplifies and elaborates on the lessons of the Craft.  In the Scottish Rite, all brothers seek to develop society and themselves. They teach new brothers the importance of becoming more patient, generous, tolerant, compassionate, and thoughtful.

So what makes the Scottish Rite so special?

What makes Scottish Rite Freemasonry special today is that they help society develop by supporting education, funding museums, benefiting the arts, assisting with medical research, and aiding the needy. Scottish Rite Masons are giving both time and money to many projects, which helps the community were they live and the society, which is made up of the communities citizens, to grow and develop. It is fundamental teaching of the Scottish Rite that we build our community and our nation, while focusing on benefiting all its citizens.

They sponsor 165 Scottish Rite Childhood Language Disorders Clinics, Centers, and Programs nationwide. Our efforts have been recognized by national awards for our work in speech and language development in children. The Scottish Rite Brothers selected childhood language and learning disorders because they affect more children than all other childhood conditions combined. To hear, to speak, to understand these are the essentials in the development of every young mind.

The Scottish Rite Mason studies mankind’s greatest questions and problems. They have fun doing things together as men in fraternity sharing dramatic, philanthropic, and social events. The Scottish Rite Freemasons strives to ask himself daily to consider just how those principles relate to his everyday lives. Once again, the Scottish Rite is often called the ‘University of Freemasonry” because it’s important lessons and teaching to help a man become the best he can be.

Freemasonry Report
Freemasonry Report

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How can I find California Freemason Lodges? – Find a Lodge Near You

How can I find California Freemason Lodges? - Find a Lodge Near You Now
Freemasonry Report
Freemasonry Report – Get Your Answers Here

How can I find California Freemason Lodges? – Find a Lodge Near You

How can I find California Freemason Lodges? – Find a Lodge Near You today! Did you know that you and your family are welcomed to visit any Lodge within the State of California? It’s true – many Lodges host Family Nights, Open Lodge Meetings, Presentation and Award Events, and Social Gatherings in what Masons in California call their ‘Grand Lodge‘. Simply use the link below to contact a Lodge nearest you. Sometimes, towns are so close that one lodge actually covers both. While for rural communities – there maybe a county wide lodge in some cases.

Freemasonry report for the Grand Lodge of California

The mission of the Masons of California is to foster personal growth and improve the lives of others. Further, their mission is guided by the enduring and relevant principles of our fraternity:

  1. Brotherly love. Freemasons of the Grand Lodge of California value respect, freedom, kindness, tolerance, and our differences – religious, ethnic, cultural, social, generational, and educational – and strive for harmony in our individual lives, in our lodges, and in the global community.
  2. Relief. California Freemason’s take responsibility for the well-being of our brothers, our families, and the community as a whole. We provide relief through philanthropy, community involvement, and delivery of excellent care.
  3. Truth. They also stay true to our personal code of conduct and ethics – honor, integrity, personal responsibility, and the continuous pursuit of knowledge.

Learn about the California Freemason Lodges – Here is how you can find a Lodge Near You!

When you call the lodge nearest you – just ask to attend the next open event, or schedule a visit with the Worshipful Master and Secretary.

The Worshipful Master and Officers of the Lodge will be happy to give you a tour of their Lodge. While touring the lodge building ask questions and learn more about how Freemasons helped improve your local community. The Lodge Officers are capable of explaining What is Freemasonry and how becoming a member can be a benefit to you and your family.  Many times, the Lodge Officers will go into detail about the history of Freemasonry and their particular Lodge.  Lastly, remember to invite your family members to ask questions and get the answers they are looking for.  California Freemasons pride themselves on being open and honest to directly address any of your questions or concerns. Here is the link to the lodge locator for the Grand Lodge Of California.

A Brief History of Freemasonry in California

Masonry has been an integral part of California for more than 150 years. During the Gold Rush of 1849, thousands of settlers came to California in search of fortune. Many of these men were Masons and brought with them Masonic values and traditions. Not surprisingly, some of California’s first Masonic lodges were established in the mining towns of the Gold Country. Therefore, in 1850 – the same year that California became a state – the Grand Lodge of California was established in Sacramento.

Did you know that within 10 years, the number of Masonic lodges in the new state had grown from 11 to 130, while membership soared from 258 to more than 5,000. Over the years, the Masons have played a key role in shaping the history of California. To date, 19 California governors have been Masons, and at least four California Masons have been elected to the U.S. Senate. With that being said, today there are more than 50,000 members and about 330 lodges, making the Grand Lodge of California one of the largest in the world.

Who is the top leader in a Grand Lodge of California? 

The top leader is the Grand Master. He leads and manages the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of California. For more information about the Grand Master – please visit the Grand Lodge of California’s website.

Please note that the Freemasonry Report is run by Masons but it is not connected to, doing business with, or representing any Grand Lodge.

How can I find Florida Freemason Lodges? – Find a Lodge Near You

How can I find Florida Freemason Lodges? - Find a Lodge Near You Now

How can I find Florida Freemason Lodges? – Find a Lodge Near You

How can I find Florida Freemason Lodges? – Find a Lodge Near You today! Did you know that you and your family are welcomed to visit any Lodge within the State of Florida? It’s true – many Lodges host Family Nights, Open Lodge Meetings, Presentation and Award Events, and Social Gatherings in what Masons in Florida call their ‘Grand Lodge‘. Simply use the link below to contact a Lodge nearest you. Sometimes, towns are so close that one lodge actually covers both. While for rural communities – there maybe a county wide lodge in some cases.

Grand Lodge of Florida - Masonic Logo for the Freemasonry ReportFinding Florida Freemason Lodges is answered here – Find a Lodge Near You!

When you call the lodge nearest you – just ask to attend the next open event, or schedule a visit with the Worshipful Master and Secretary.

The Worshipful Master and Officers of the Lodge will be happy to give you a tour of their Lodge. While touring the lodge building ask questions and learn more about how Freemasons helped improve your local community. The Lodge Officers are capable of explaining What is Freemasonry and how becoming a member can be a benefit to you and your family.  Many times, the Lodge Officers will go into detail about the history of Freemasonry and their particular Lodge.  Lastly, remember to invite your family members to ask questions and get the answers they are looking for.  Florida Freemasons pride themselves on being open and honest to directly address any of your questions or concerns. Here is the link to the lodge locator for the Grand Lodge Of Florida.

Who are the top masonic leaders in the Grand Lodge of Florida?

In the State of Florida, the Grand Lodge Elected Officers are as follows: Most Worshipful Grand Master; Deputy Grand Master; Senior Grand Warden; Junior Grand Warden; Grand Secretary; and the Grand Treasurer. The Most Worshipful Grand Master is the top leader of the Grand Lodge of Florida.

Grand Lodge Appointed Officers in the Grand Lodge are as follows: Grand Chaplain and is titled the – Right Reverend; W∴ Grand Orator; W∴ Grand Marshal;  W∴ Senior Grand Deacon; W∴ Junior Grand Deacon; W∴ Grand Standard Bearer; W∴ Grand Sword Bearer; W∴ Senior Grand Steward; W∴ Junior Grand Steward; W∴ Grand Pursuivant; W∴ Grand Tyler; W∴ Grand Historian; and W∴ Grand Musician.

Who are the top masonic leaders in a blue lodge in Florida?

In the State of Florida, the blue lodge elected officers are as follows: the Worshipful Master; Senior Warden; Junior Warden; Secretary; and the Treasurer. The Worshipful Master is the top leader of a blue lodge in Florida. The appointed officers in a blue lodge are as follows: Chaplain; Marshal;  Senior Deacon; Junior Deacon; Senior Steward; Junior Steward; Historian; Tyler; and the Musician.

What Florida cities or towns have a Masonic Lodge?

Here is the cities and townships with a Masonic Lodge in Florida: Cantonment;  Century; Pensacola; Jay; Pace; Milton; Gulf Breeze; Fort Walton Beach; Baker; Crestview; Defuniak Springs; Freeport; Laurel Hill; Niceville; Paxton; Bonifay; Cottondale; Blountstown; Westville; Marianna; Chipley; Ponce De Leon; Vernon; Wausau; Panama City; Apalachicola; Callaway; Lynn Haven Port Saint Joe; Saint Andrews; Wewahitchka; Crawfordville; Carrabelle; Chattahoochee;  Havana;  Monticello; Tallahassee; Live Oak; Branford; Lake City; Wellborn; Day; Greenville; Jasper; Old Town; Lake City; Madison; Mayo; Branford; Perry; Cross City; Wellborn; Fernandina Beach; Baldwin; and Callahan.

These are cities and townships with a Masonic Lodge in Florida as well: Macclenny; Jacksonville; Sanderson; Neptune Beach; Live Oak; Orange Park; Jacksonville Beach; Archer;  Starke; Chiefland; Gainesville; Hawthorne; High Springs; Newberry; Lake Butler; Micanopy; Brooker; Raiford; Waldo; Trenton; Saint Augustine; Bunnell; Green Cove Springs; Hastings; Lake Como; Keystone Heights; Middleburg; Palatka; Palatka; Ormond Beach; Belleview; Dunnellon; Inglis; Fort McCoy; Ocala; Silver Springs; Williston; Deltona; Daytona Beach; New Smyrna Beach; Palm Coast; DeLand; Sanford; Barberville; Brooksville; Bushnell; Inverness; Dade City; Homosassa;  New Port Richey; Floral City; Zephyrhills; Clermont; Groveland; Leesburg; Tavares; Mount Dora; The Villages; Umatilla; and Wildwood.

A few more cities and townships with a Masonic Lodge in Florida to review: Orlando; Casselberry; Saint Cloud; Apopka; Kissimee; Oviedo; Saint Cloud; Winter Garden; Winter Park; Indialantic; Cocoa; Cocoa Beach; Mims; Melbourne; Titusville; Merritt Island; Palm Bay; Clearwater; Dunedin; Madeira Beach; Trinity; Largo; St. Petersburg; Safety Harbor; Tarpon Springs; Tampa; Lutz; Brandon; Riverview; Land O Lakes; Plant City; Temple Terrace; Dover; Bowling Green; Mulberry; Fort Meade; Frostproof; Haines City; Kathleen; Lake Wales; Lakeland; Lake Placid; Avon Park; Sebring; Lake Alfred; Bartow; Wauchula; Winter Haven; Stuart; Fort Pierce Moore Haven; Okeechobee; Sebastian; Clewiston; Vero Beach; Englewood; Bradenton; Arcadia; Sarasota; Punta Gorda; Venice; and West Bradenton.

The final group of cities and towns with a Masonic Lodge in the State of Florida to read over: Cape Coral; Naples; Fort Myers Beach; LaBelle; Lehigh Acres; North Fort Myers; Everglades City; Fort Myers; East Naples; Boca Raton; Boynton Beach; Greenacres; Palm Beach Gardens; Lake Worth; West Palm Beach; Jupiter;  Dania Beach; Fort Lauderdale; Dania; Oakland Park; Deerfield Beach; Dania Beach; West Hollywood; Pembroke Pines; South Miami; Coral Gables; Hialeah; Miami; Miami Springs; Homestead; Miami Shores; Tavernier; Key West; and Marathon.

Please be aware that some Masonic Lodges represent an area for more rural or urban places around the State of Florida. So therefore, it is not uncommon to see a Masonic in the neighboring township representing both towns, a Masonic Lodge representing the county if it is very rural, or a Masonic Lodge representing only the area Southern, Eastern, Central, Western or Northern part of a city in some cases. Here is the link to the lodge locator for the Grand Lodge of Florida

Please note that the Freemasonry Report is run by Masons but it is not connected to, doing business with, or representing any Grand Lodge.

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